See also: Aur and aur-

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

aur m (plural aurs)

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of or

Further readingEdit

  • “aur” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly of Baltic origin. Compare Lithuanian šiaurė (north). Cognate to Finnish auer (haze).

NounEdit

aur (genitive auru, partitive auru)

  1. steam

InflectionEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aurum. Compare Romansch aur, Venetian oro, Italian oro, Dalmatian jaur, Romanian aur, French or.

NounEdit

aur m

  1. gold

GutnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse aurr, from Proto-Germanic *auraz.

NounEdit

aur m

  1. gravel bank, gravel, rough sand, dry gravel soil, pebble in fields

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse aurr (mud), from Proto-Germanic *auraz.

NounEdit

aur m (genitive singular aurs, nominative plural aurar)

  1. mud, mire
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Somehow from Old Norse eyrir (an ounce (of silver); money).

NounEdit

aur m (genitive singular aurs, nominative plural aurar)

  1. (money) money
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay aur, from Proto-Malayic *haur, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qauʀ, from Proto-Austronesian *qauʀ.

NounEdit

aur (first-person possessive aurku, second-person possessive aurmu, third-person possessive aurnya)

  1. bamboo

SynonymsEdit


MalayEdit

 
Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms
 
Aur

EtymologyEdit

First attested in the Talang Tuo inscription, 684AD. From Proto-Malayic *haur, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qauʀ, from Proto-Austronesian *qauʀ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aur (Jawi spelling اٴور‎, plural aur-aur, informal 1st possessive aurku, impolite 2nd possessive aurmu, 3rd possessive aurnya)

  1. bamboo (plant)
  2. bamboo (wood)

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse aurr, from Proto-Germanic *auraz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aur m (definite singular auren, uncountable)

  1. (collective) a mix between gravel, coarse sand

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan aur, from Latin aurum.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

aur m (uncountable)

  1. gold (metal)

Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

aur m

  1. accusative singular of aurr

Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aurum.

NounEdit

aur m (oblique plural aurs, nominative singular aurs, nominative plural aur)

  1. gold (metal)

DescendantsEdit

  • Occitan: aur

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

 
Romanian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ro
Chemical element
Au
Previous: platină (Pt)
Next: mercur (Hg)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aurum, from Proto-Italic *auzom, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂é-h₂us-o- (glow), from *h₂ews- (to dawn, become light, become red).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aur n (uncountable)

  1. gold

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader) or
  • (Surmiran) ôr

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aurum.

NounEdit

aur m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) gold

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ørr, from Proto-Germanic *arwaz.

NounEdit

aur

  1. The mark left by a wound

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh eur, from Proto-Brythonic *ėür, from Vulgar Latin from Latin aureus (golden, adjective). The vowel au (/aɨ̯/) must have undergone internal i-affection, showing that this word is derived from the adjective aureus, not the noun aurum, which gave the now archaic synonym awr (not to be confused with awr (hour) from hōra).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aur m (usually uncountable, plural eurau)

  1. gold

AdjectiveEdit

aur (feminine singular aur, plural aur, not comparable)

  1. golden (made of gold)
  2. gold (in colour)
  3. (figuratively) golden

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
aur unchanged unchanged haur
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “aur”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies