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See also: Baste and basté

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French bastir (build, construct, sew up (a garment)).

VerbEdit

 
Basting material to a pattern before cutting it.

baste (third-person singular simple present bastes, present participle basting, simple past and past participle basted)

  1. To sew with long or loose stitches, as for temporary use, or in preparation for gathering the fabric.
    • 1991 June 14, J.F. Pirro, “Custom Work”, in Chicago Reader[1]:
      He bastes the coat together with thick white thread almost like string, using stitches big enough to be ripped out easily later.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown, possibly from Old French basser (moisten, soak).

VerbEdit

baste (third-person singular simple present bastes, present participle basting, simple past and past participle basted)

  1. To sprinkle flour and salt and drip butter or fat on, as on meat in roasting.
  2. (by extension) To coat over something.
    • 2001 April 20, Peter Margasak, “Almost Famous”, in Chicago Reader[2]:
      Ice Cold Daydream" bastes the bayou funk of the Meters in swirling psychedelia, while "Sweet Thang," a swampy blues cowritten with his dad, sounds like something from Dr. John's "Night Tripper" phase.
  3. To mark (sheep, etc.) with tar.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

baste (plural bastes)

  1. A basting; a sprinkling of drippings etc. in cooking.
    • 1876, The Odd Fellow's Companion
      "Just like a leg of mutton being roasted before a slow fire without any one to give it a baste," groaned the old man.

Etymology 3Edit

Perhaps from the cookery sense of baste or from some Scandinavian source. Compare Old Norse beysta (to beat, thresh) (whence Danish børste (to beat up)). Compare also Swedish basa (to beat with a rod, to flog) and Swedish bösta (to thump). Might be related French bâton (formerly baston), which means stick (English baton comes from bâton) ; see also French bastonnade, the act of beating with a stick.

VerbEdit

baste (third-person singular simple present bastes, present participle basting, simple past and past participle basted)

  1. (archaic, slang) To beat with a stick; to cudgel.
    • July 1660, Samuel Pepys, Diaries
      One man was basted by the keeper for carrying some people over on his back through the waters.
TranslationsEdit
ReferencesEdit
  • [Francis] Grose [et al.] (1811), “Baste”, in Lexicon Balatronicum. A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence. [], London: Printed for C. Chappell, [], OCLC 23927885.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

baste

  1. singular past indicative and subjunctive of bassen

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

baste m (plural bastes)

  1. ace of clubs

NounEdit

baste f (plural bastes)

  1. basque (clothing)

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English bæst.

NounEdit

baste

  1. Alternative form of bast (bast)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French bast.

NounEdit

baste

  1. Alternative form of base (illegitimacy)

Northern SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈpasːte/

NounEdit

baste

  1. spoon

InflectionEdit

Even e-stem, st-stt gradation
Nominative baste
Genitive bastte
Singular Plural
Nominative baste basttet
Accusative bastte basttiid
Genitive bastte basttiid
Illative bastii basttiide
Locative basttes basttiin
Comitative basttiin basttiiguin
Essive basten
Possessive forms
Singular Dual Plural
1st person basten basteme bastemet
2nd person bastet bastede bastedet
3rd person bastes basteska basteset

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

baste

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of bastar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of bastar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of bastar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of bastar.