See also: Berg, Berğ, and Bërg

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of iceberg.

NounEdit

berg (plural bergs)

  1. An iceberg.
    • 1997, Rugh, David J.; Kim E.W. Shelden, “Spotted Seals, Phoca Largha, in Alaska”, in Marine Fisheries Review, volume 59, number 1, page 1:
      The ice was thin, and only a few areas had bergs large enough to support marine mammals.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Afrikaans berg. Doublet of barrow.

NounEdit

berg (plural bergs)

  1. (chiefly South Africa) mountain
    • 2004, Alan Goldfein, “A Wonderful Drive”, in Europe's Macadam, America's Tar: How America Really Compares to "Old Europe"[1], American Editions, →ISBN, page 46:
      There are in fact many such subterranean underways in Germany, speeding traffic beneath bergs, burgs and villages and into and around and under big city downtowns ...

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch berg.

NounEdit

berg (plural berge, diminutive bergie)

  1. mountain
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: berg

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch bergen.

VerbEdit

berg (present berg, present participle bergende, past participle geberg)

  1. To salvage, usually cargo from a ship.
  2. To store; to stash; to put away.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Norwegian berg, from Old Norse berg. Also from German Berg.

NounEdit

berg n (singular definite berget, plural indefinite berge)

  1. (chiefly Norway) alternative form of bjerg (mountain, hill)
    • 1907, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, Moltke Moe, editor, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnsons fortællinger, page 185:
      han [så] manden [] kjøre gjennom bragende ildsluer ind i det åbne berget, der stod over ham som en port.
      he [saw] the man [] drive through crackling fires into the open mountain, which stood over him like a gate.

DescendantsEdit

  • Norwegian Bokmål: berg

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch berch, from Old Dutch berg, from Proto-West Germanic *berg, from Proto-Germanic *bergaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-.

NounEdit

berg m (plural bergen, diminutive bergje n)

  1. mountain, hill
  2. (figurative) a large amount, a pile; a stock, reserve; a surplus
Derived termsEdit

(actually mountain-related):

(toponyms):

(figurative):

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

berg

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bergen
  2. imperative of bergen

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse berg, from Proto-Germanic *bergaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-.

NounEdit

berg n (genitive singular bergs, plural berg)

  1. cliff, cliff face

DeclensionEdit

Declension of berg
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative berg bergið berg bergini
accusative berg bergið berg bergini
dative bergi berginum bergum bergunum
genitive bergs bergsins berga berganna

Related termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

 
Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse berg.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

berg n (genitive singular bergs, nominative plural berg)

  1. rock, boulder
  2. cliff, precipice
  3. mountain
  4. rock face

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


LimburgishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch berch.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæ˨.ʀəç/, [ˈbæː˨.ʀəç]
  • Hyphenation: berg
  • Rhymes: -æʀəç

NounEdit

berg m

  1. (geography) mountain, hill (refers to any elevated terrain)
  2. (figuratively) pile, heap
  3. (in the plural) mountain range
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From earlier barg (with an umlaut on the root vowel). From Proto-West Germanic *barug, from Proto-Germanic *barugaz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæ˧.ʀəç/, [ˈbæː˧.ʀəç]
  • Hyphenation: berg
  • Rhymes: -æʀəç

NounEdit

berg m

  1. (some dialects, including Maastrichtian, Sittard, Valkenburg) a castrated pig, swine
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæ˦.ʀəç/, [ˈbæː˦.ʀəç]
  • Hyphenation: berg
  • Rhymes: -æʀəç

NounEdit

berg

  1. nominative/genitive/dative/accusative plural of berg
  2. (archaic) accusative singular of berg

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ġebeorg (unprefixed beorg is found in compounds; compare scūrbeorg (roof, shelter from the storm)), from beorgan (to shelter, protect).

NounEdit

berg

  1. protection, shelter
  2. guardian, watchman

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse berg, bjarg, from Proto-Germanic *bergaz. Related to berge (rescue, bring to shore/land).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɛɾɡ/, [bæɾɡ]

NounEdit

berg n (definite singular berget, indefinite plural berg, definite plural berga or bergene)

  1. mountain, hill
  2. rock
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

berg

  1. imperative of berge

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɛrɡ/, [bærɡ], [bæɾˠɡ], [bæɾɡ]
  • (South Eastern Norway) IPA(key): /bɛrj/, [bæɾj]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse berg, bjarg, from Proto-Germanic *bergaz.

NounEdit

berg n (definite singular berget, indefinite plural berg, definite plural berga)

  1. mountain, hill
  2. rock
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Doublet of bjørg, from Old Norse bjǫrg.

NounEdit

berg f (definite singular berga, indefinite plural berger, definite plural bergene)

  1. help, saving, salvation
Related termsEdit

Male given names:

Female given names:

ReferencesEdit


Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *berg.

NounEdit

berg m

  1. mountain, hill

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • berg”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *berg.

NounEdit

berg m (plural berga)

  1. mountain, hill

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old NorseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *bergą, *bergaz.

NounEdit

berg n

  1. rock, boulder
  2. cliff, precipice

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • berg”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Zoëga, Geir T. (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic[2], Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *berg.

NounEdit

berg m

  1. mountain, hill

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

berg m or n (feminine singular bergă, masculine plural bergi, feminine and neuter plural berge)

  1. Obsolete form of berc.

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • berg in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bjarg, berg, from Proto-Germanic *bergaz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

berg n

  1. mountain
  2. bedrock, mine
    man har borrat genom berget, för att finna rikedom
    they have drilled through the bedrock, hoping to find wealth
    eld i berget!
    warning cry that an explosive charge has been ignited in a mine
  3. a mountain, a very large heap
    Ett berg med papper
    A mountain of paper

DeclensionEdit

Declension of berg 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative berg berget berg bergen
Genitive bergs bergets bergs bergens

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

NounEdit

berg n

  1. Alternative spelling of bärg