See also: Brant and bränt

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

New Latin/Medieval Latin Branta, latinized form of Old Norse brandgás (sheldrake), literally "burnt (black) goose," from Proto-Germanic *brandaz (burning) + *gans (goose).[1][2][3]

NounEdit

brant (plural brants or brant)

  1. (Canada, US) Any of several wild geese, of the genus Branta, that breed in the Arctic, but especially the brent goose, Branta bernicla.
    • 1855, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “Book I”, in The Song of Hiawatha:
      I have given you roe and reindeer, / I have given you brant and beaver, / Filled the marshes full of wild-fowl, / Filled the rivers full of fishes; / Why then are you not contented? / Why then will you hunt each other?
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jobling, James A (2010). The Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names. London: Christopher Helm. pp. 70, 77.
  2. ^ Kear, Janet (2005): Ducks, Geese and Swans: General chapters, species accounts (Anhima to Salvadorina), p. 306
  3. ^ Sandrock & Prior (2014): The Scientific Nomenclature of Birds in the Upper Midwest, p. 25

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English brant. Cognate with Scots brent, Old Norse brantr, brattr (Faroese and Icelandic brattur, Danish brat, Norwegian Bokmål bratt, Swedish brant).

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brant (comparative more brant, superlative most brant)

  1. (dialectal) Steep, precipitous.
    • (Can we date this quote by Ascham and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Grapes grow on the brant rocks so wonderfully that ye will marvel how any man dare climb up to them.
  2. (Scotland) smooth; unwrinkled
    • (Can we date this quote by Burns and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Your bonnie brow was brent.

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *brand, from Proto-Germanic *brandaz.

NounEdit

brant m

  1. fire
  2. burning piece of wood
  3. firewood, fuel
  4. burn (mark on the skin or something else)

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: brand
  • Limburgish: brandj

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

brant

  1. intransitive simple past of brenne

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain origin, but possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰren- (project), related to Old Norse brant (steep), Latvian bruôds (roof ridge).

Cognate with Old Norse brantr, brattr (Faroese and Icelandic brattur, Danish brat, Norwegian bratt, Swedish brant).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brant

  1. tall, high, steep

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  •   Old Norse language on Wikipedia.Wikipedia . Accessed August 5, 2005.
  • “brant” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • Pokorny, Julius, Indogermanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch, Tübingen: A. Francke Verlag, 1959.

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

brant m (oblique plural branz or brantz, nominative singular branz or brantz, nominative plural brant)

  1. Alternative form of branc

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain origin, but possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰren- (project), related to Old English brant (steep), Latvian bruôds (roof ridge), as well as barmr (rim, edge).

NounEdit

brant ?

  1. (Eastern dialect) precipice

ReferencesEdit

  •   Old Norse language on Wikipedia.Wikipedia . Accessed August 5, 2005.
  • “brant” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • Pokorny, Julius, Indogermanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch, Tübingen: A. Francke Verlag, 1959.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse brantr, brattr, of uncertain origin, but possibly from Proto-Indo-European *bʰren- (project), related to Old English brant (steep), Latvian bruôds (roof ridge).

Cognate with Faroese and Icelandic brattur, Danish brat, Norwegian Bokmål bratt, and Old English brant, bront (English brant, brent, Scots brent).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

brant (comparative brantare, superlative brantast)

  1. steep (near-vertical)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of brant
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular brant brantare brantast
Neuter singular brant brantare brantast
Plural branta brantare brantast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 brante brantare brantaste
All branta brantare brantaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “brant” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • Pokorny, Julius, Indogermanisches Etymologisches Wörterbuch, Tübingen: A. Francke Verlag, 1959.

VilamovianEdit

NounEdit

brant m

  1. fire, blaze
  2. gangrene
  3. grain smut