See also: brise

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Yiddish ברית (bris), from Hebrew בְּרִית (covenant).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bris (plural brises or brisses or britot)

  1. (Judaism) Ritual male circumcision.
    • 1974, Phillip E. Goble, Everything You Need to Grow a Messianic Synagogue, page 22,
      This bath symbolizes both a spiritual mikveh (Jewish purification bath) and a spiritual bris (circumcision which makes one a Jew).
    • 1993, Miriam Rose, Miriam Zakon, The Baker Family Circus, Baker's Dozen (Omnibus), Volume 4, page 129,
      The night before the bris, he invited nine of his little buddies to come and say kerias shema around the baby's bassinet. Mommy and Daddy, who flew in for the bris, were so touched, they kept dabbing their eyes and coughing.
    • 2009, Jeffrey Shandler, Jews, God, and Videotape: Religion and Media in America, page 155,
      Although indigenous visual documentation of the bris was, until the advent of video, limited and often oblique, the ceremony is a longstanding fixture of Christian art.
    • 2013, Ted Falcon, David Blatner, Judaism For Dummies, 2nd Edition, page 109,
      However, if the baby is born on a Wednesday night, then the bris would occur on the following Thursday morning because Jewish days begin at sundown, and the bris is tradionally performed during the day. (Note that the Talmud (see Chapter 3) states if the baby's health is in question, then the bris must be postponed.)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • bris periah

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IcelandicEdit

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia is

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bris n (genitive singular briss, nominative plural bris)

  1. (anatomy) pancreas

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish brissid, from Proto-Celtic *bris (break), from Proto-Indo-European *bhri-s-, from the root *bhréi- (to cut, break).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bris (present analytic briseann, future analytic brisfidh, verbal noun briseadh, past participle briste)

  1. to break, fracture
  2. to sack, fire, dismiss
  3. (banking) to cash
  4. (of dam) to burst
  5. (of government) to overthrow

ConjugationEdit

NounEdit

bris f (genitive brise, nominative plural briseanna)

  1. loss
    Ní maith liom do bhris.
    I'm sorry for your loss.

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bris bhris mbris
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

bris m

  1. breeze

InflectionEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

bris m

  1. breeze

InflectionEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish brissid, from Proto-Celtic *bris (break), from Proto-Indo-European *bhri-s-, from the root *bhréi- (to cut, break).

VerbEdit

bris (verbal noun briseadh)

  1. break, smash
  2. breach

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

brȋs m (Cyrillic spelling бри̑с)

  1. (medicine) swab, smear

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bris c

  1. breeze

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

Plural form could also be "brisar"

Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 04:36