See also: búda, bùdà, Buda, and Búda

Bikol CentralEdit

ConjunctionEdit

buda (budâ) (Bikol Legazpi)

  1. and
    Synonym: asin

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

A Berber borrowing, originally spread in African Latin and then gradually replacing the native ulva, compare Kabyle tabuda (Typha angustifolia) etc., also Arabic بُرْدِيّ(burdiyy), بُوط(būṭ, cattail) from which some forms have later been reborrowed into Romance, listed there. There is an interpolation in the Dioscurides locus about θαψία (thapsía) after φέρουλα σιλβέστρις saying that the Africans call it βοιδίν (boidín) (Ἅφροι βοιδίν, left out in Dioscórides interactivo), which mirrors a Berber collective morpheme -īn (as explained by Bertoldi 1947 p. 195 seq.).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

buda f (genitive budae); first declension

  1. cattail (Typha spp.)
    Synonym: ulva

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative buda budae
Genitive budae budārum
Dative budae budīs
Accusative budam budās
Ablative budā budīs
Vocative buda budae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

buda
budētum

ReferencesEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably borrowed from Middle High German buode (German Bude).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

buda f (diminutive budka)

  1. booth
  2. stall (small open-fronted shop)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • buda in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag
  • buda in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.
  • Lower Sorbian vocabulary. In: Haspelmath, M. & Tadmor, U. (eds.) World Loanword Database. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

ManchuEdit

RomanizationEdit

buda

  1. Romanization of ᠪᡠᡩ᠋ᠠ

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

buda n

  1. definite plural of bud

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German buode (German Bude).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbu.da/
  • (file)

NounEdit

buda f (diminutive budka)

  1. doghouse (shelter for a dog)
  2. (usually derogatory) cabin, shed (temporary structure to shelter something)
  3. (colloquial) school (institution dedicated to teaching and learning)
  4. (informal, soccer) goal (area into which the players attempt to put an object)

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brückner, Aleksander (1927) , “buda”, in Słownik etymologiczny języka polskiego (in Polish)

Further readingEdit

  • buda in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • buda in Polish dictionaries at PWN

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

buda m (plural budas)

  1. Buddha (especially a statue or figurine)

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

a buda (third-person singular present budează, past participle budat1st conj.

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbuda/, [ˈbu.ð̞a]
  • Hyphenation: bu‧da

NounEdit

buda m (plural budas)

  1. Buddha
  2. bulrush (Typha latifolia)