cabal

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From French cabale, from Medieval Latin cabala, which in turn is derived from the Hebrew קבלה ‎(kabbala, something received) (i.e., from tradition, from antiquity). It is likely that the mystical often secretive nature of Kabbalah led to formation of the word cabal.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cabal ‎(plural cabals)

  1. A usually secret exclusive organization of individuals gathered for a political purpose.
    The cabal is plotting to take over the world.
  2. A secret plot.
    The cabal to destroy the building was foiled by federal agents.
  3. An identifiable group within the tradition of Discordianism.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

cabal ‎(third-person singular simple present cabals, present participle caballing, simple past and past participle caballed)

  1. To engage in the activities of a cabal
    • 1840, George Payne Rainsford James, The king's highway, volume 1, page 68-69:
      [] I believed her to have been carried off by some persons belonging to a party of Jacobites who were known to be caballing against the government, though to what extent was not then ascertained.

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit


CatalanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cabal m, f ‎(masculine and feminine plural cabals)

  1. complete, total
  2. upright, well-rounded

NounEdit

cabal m ‎(plural cabals)

  1. possessions

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cabal m, f ‎(plural cabais, comparable)

  1. complete
  2. rigorous
  3. exact
  4. satisfactory

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

cabo +‎ -al

AdjectiveEdit

cabal m, f ‎(plural cabales)

  1. upright

Derived termsEdit

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