Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Medieval Latin exactare, reg., from Latin exactus, perfect passive participle of exigō (demand, claim as due" or "measure by a standard, weigh, test), from ex (out) + agō (drive).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzækt/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ækt

AdjectiveEdit

exact (comparative more exact, superlative most exact)

  1. Precisely agreeing with a standard, a fact, or the truth; perfectly conforming; neither exceeding nor falling short in any respect.
    The clock keeps exact time.
    He paid the exact debt.
    an exact copy of a letter
    exact accounts
  2. Habitually careful to agree with a standard, a rule, or a promise; accurate; methodical; punctual.
    a man exact in observing an appointment
    In my doings I was exact.
  3. Precisely or definitely conceived or stated; strict.
  4. (algebra, of a sequence of groups connected by homomorphisms) Such that the kernel of one homomorphism is the image of the preceding one.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

exact (third-person singular simple present exacts, present participle exacting, simple past and past participle exacted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To demand and enforce the payment or performance of, sometimes in a forcible or imperious way.
    to exact tribute, fees, or obedience from someone
    • Bible, Luke iii. 13
      He said into them, Exact no more than that which is appointed you.
    • 2018, Edo Konrad, "Living in the constant shadow of settler violence", +972 Magazine:
      Their goal is retributive: to exact a price from Palestinian civilians (and in some cases left-wing Israeli Jews, Christians, and Israeli security forces) for actions Israeli authorities take against the settlers, usually building enforcement in illegally built settlements.
  2. (transitive) To make desirable or necessary.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Massinger
      My designs exact me in another place.
  3. (transitive) To inflict; to forcibly obtain or produce.
    to exact revenge on someone

Usage notesEdit

  • Often used with the preposition from or on.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

exact (comparative more exact, superlative most exact)

  1. exactly
    She's wearing the exact same sweater as I am!

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French exact, from Middle French exact, from Latin exāctus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

exact (comparative exacter, superlative exactst)

  1. exact, precise

InflectionEdit

Inflection of exact
uninflected exact
inflected exacte
comparative exacter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial exact exacter het exactst
het exactste
indefinite m./f. sing. exacte exactere exactste
n. sing. exact exacter exactste
plural exacte exactere exactste
definite exacte exactere exactste
partitive exacts exacters

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin exāctus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛɡ.zakt/, (old-fashioned) /ɛɡ.za/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

exact (feminine singular exacte, masculine plural exacts, feminine plural exactes)

  1. exact; precise

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French exact.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

exact m or n (feminine singular exactă, masculine plural exacți, feminine and neuter plural exacte)

  1. exact, precise

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

exact

  1. exactly, precisely

See alsoEdit