cathair

See also: cathaír

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

cat +‎ hair

NounEdit

cathair (plural cathair)

  1. The hair of a cat.
    • 1993, Allen Warfield, Al Brooks, Effective Telemarketing: How to Sell Over the Telephone, page 111:
      How can you tell a cat owner? all the little claw marks on their back. . .Or by the cathair that sticks to their suit.
    • 1993, Lilian Jackson Braun, The Cat Who Wasn't There:
      The conscientious Mrs. Fulgrove was driving away as he pulled into the barnyard, and he waved to her; the woman's scowl indicated that she had worked overtime because of the vast amount of cathair everywhere.
    • 2000, Tamaqua: Volume Seven Issue One, page 75:
      Meditate on the steady drone and the rocking of the back and forth vacuum dance you do as you suck up the cathair, the ashes, the seeds, the stray leaves.
    • 2000, Nimrod International Journal - Volume 44, page 128:
      Cat likes to brush against it and sun on the deck chair, the cushion is a mat of gray cathair.

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish cathair, from Proto-Celtic *katrixs (fortification).

NounEdit

cathair f (genitive singular cathrach or caithreach, nominative plural cathracha)

  1. city
  2. (historical) enclosed church establishment; monastic city
  3. (archaeology) circular stone fort, a ringfort
  4. dwelling(-place); bed, lair
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

cathair f (genitive singular caithre or caithreach)

  1. Alternative form of caithir (down, pubic hair)
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cathair chathair gcathair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *katrixs (fortification); possibly cognate with Old English hēaþor (enclosure, prison) or Serbo-Croatian kȍtar (administrative unit, province).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaθərʲ/, [ˈkaθɨrʲ]

NounEdit

cathair f (genitive cathrach, nominative plural cathraig)

  1. stone enclosure, fortress, castle; dwelling
  2. monastic settlement, enclosure; monastery, convent
    • c. 800, Broccán’s Hymn, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, p. 328, ll. 9–10:
      Nī bo fri óigthea acher   cāinbói fri lobru trúagu:
      for maig arutacht cathir   dollaid rosnāde slúagu.
      She was not harsh to guests: gentle was she to the wretched sick:
      on a plain she built a convent: may it protect hosts into the Kingdom!
  3. fortified city, city
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 13b1:
      (do·adb)adar in taidbsiu hi siu tra do(naib) coic cetaib [] ro·bói isin chaithir isind aimsir sin
      this appearance, then, is manifested to the five hundred [] that was in the city at that time

DeclensionEdit

Feminine k-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative cathair cathraigL cathraig
Vocative cathair cathraigL cathracha
Accusative cathraigN cathraigL cathracha
Genitive cathrach cathrach cathrachN
Dative cathraigL, caithir cathrachaib cathrachaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: cathair
  • Manx: caayr
  • Scottish Gaelic: cathair

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cathair chathair cathair
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  1. ^ Ranko Matasović (2009) Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic[1] (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 194

Scottish GaelicEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish cathaír (chair), from Latin cathēdra, from Ancient Greek καθέδρα (kathédra). Cognate with Irish cathaoir.

NounEdit

cathair f (genitive singular cathrach, plural cathraichean)

  1. chair, seat, bench, throne

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish cathair.

NounEdit

cathair f (genitive singular cathrach, plural cathraichean)

  1. town, city

Derived termsEdit

  • catharra (civil; civic, public, adjective)

Etymology 3Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

cathair f (genitive singular cathrach, plural cathraichean)

  1. gig (two wheeled horse drawn carriage)
  2. bed (of any garden stuff)
  3. stock, colewort, cabbage
  4. plot (of land)
  5. (obsolete) guard, sentinel, warder

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
cathair chathair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit