Open main menu
See also: chaïr

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
A chair (item of furniture).
 
Chairs (rail supports on a railway).

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English chayer, chaire, chaiere, chaere, chayre, chayere, borrowed from Old French chaiere, chaere, from Latin cathedra (seat), from Ancient Greek καθέδρα (kathédra), from κατά (katá, down) + ἕδρα (hédra, seat). Displaced native stool and settle, which now have more specialised senses. Doublet of chaise.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

chair (plural chairs)

  1. An item of furniture used to sit on or in comprising a seat, legs, back, and sometimes arm rests, for use by one person. Compare stool, couch, sofa, settee, loveseat and bench.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 12, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      There were many wooden chairs for the bulk of his visitors, and two wicker armchairs with red cloth cushions for superior people. From the packing-cases had emerged some Indian clubs, […], and all these articles […] made a scattered and untidy decoration that Mrs. Clough assiduously dusted and greatly cherished.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 19, in The China Governess[1]:
      Meanwhile Nanny Broome was recovering from her initial panic and seemed anxious to make up for any kudos she might have lost, by exerting her personality to the utmost. She took the policeman's helmet and placed it on a chair, and unfolded his tunic to shake it and fold it up again for him.
    All I need to weather a snowstorm is hot coffee, a warm fire, a good book and a comfortable chair.
  2. Clipping of chairperson.
    • 1658 March 23, Thomas Burton, John Towell Rutt, editor, Diary, London: Henry Colburn, published 1828, page 243:
      The Chair behaves himself like a Busby amongst so many school-boys [] and takes a little too much on him.
    • 1887 September 5, The Times:
      It can hardly be conceived that the Chair would fail to gain the support of the House.
    Under the rules of order adopted by the board, the chair may neither make nor second motions.
  3. (music) The seating position of a particular musician in an orchestra.
    My violin teacher used to play first chair with the Boston Pops.
  4. (rail transport) An iron block used on railways to support the rails and secure them to the sleepers, and similar devices.
  5. (chemistry) One of two possible conformers of cyclohexane rings (the other being boat), shaped roughly like a chair.
  6. (slang, with the) Ellipsis of electric chair
    • 1934, Agatha Christie, chapter 8, in Murder on the Orient Express, London: HarperCollins, published 2017, page 251:
      'All for a pig of a man who should have gone to the chair.'
    He killed a cop: he's going to get the chair.
    The court will show no mercy; if he gets convicted, it's the chair for him.
  7. A distinguished professorship at a university.
  8. A vehicle for one person; either a sedan borne upon poles, or a two-wheeled carriage drawn by one horse; a gig.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

chair (third-person singular simple present chairs, present participle chairing, simple past and past participle chaired)

  1. (transitive) to act as chairperson at; to preside over
    Bob will chair tomorrow's meeting.
  2. (transitive) to carry in a seated position upon one's shoulders, especially in celebration or victory
    • 1896, A. E. Houseman, "To An Athlete Dying Young," in A Shropshire Lad,
      The time you won your town the race
      We chaired you through the marketplace.
  3. (transitive, Wales, Britain) to award a chair to (a winning poet) at a Welsh eisteddfod
    The poet was chaired at the national Eisteddfod.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French chair, char, from Old French char, charn (earlier carn), from Latin carnem, accusative of carō, from Proto-Italic *karō, from Proto-Indo-European *ker-, *(s)ker-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chair f (plural chairs)

  1. flesh

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalloEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French cheoir, from Latin cado, cognate with French choir.

VerbEdit

chair

  1. to fall
  2. to crash
    Une avion san liméro qu'est chaite ste netey à Eastdown dan le Sussex
    A plane without number that has crashed this night at Eastdown, Sussex

ManxEdit

AdjectiveEdit

chair

  1. Lenited form of cair.

NounEdit

chair f

  1. Lenited form of cair.

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cair chair gair
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French char, charn, from Latin carnem, accusative singular of carō.

NounEdit

chair f (plural chairs)

  1. flesh

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

chair

  1. Alternative infinitive of cheoir.

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has a stressed present stem chié distinct from the unstressed stem che, as well as other irregularities. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.