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GalicianEdit

Galician cardinal numbers
 <  99 100 101  > 
    Cardinal : cen
    Ordinal : centésimo

Alternative formsEdit

  • cento (combining form only)

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese cen, from cento, from Latin centum, from Proto-Italic *kentom, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm.

NumeralEdit

cen (indeclinable)

  1. one hundred; 100

Usage notesEdit

The indeclinable form cen means "one hundred" only. To say "one hundred one", the combining form cento is used, as cento un or cento unha. Likewise, "one hundred thirty" is cento trinta, and "one hundred fifty-four" is cento cincuenta e catro.

See alsoEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

cen

  1. Nonstandard spelling of cēn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of cén.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *kiznaz, *kizną (pinewood; spruce). Cognate with Old High German kien (German Kien (pine)).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkeːn/, /ˈt͡ʃeːn/

NounEdit

ċēn m

  1. (poetic) torch
  2. the runic character (/k/ or /tʃ/)

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *kina (on this side of), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe (this, here); compare Breton ken (otherwise).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

cen (governs the accusative; triggers lenition)

  1. except
  2. without

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cen chen cen
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cen f

  1. genitive plural of cena

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English change.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cen (nominative plural cens)

  1. change, transition, turn

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *sken- (to split off) (compare Breton skant (scales), Old Irish ceinn, Irish scain (to tear, burst).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cen m (plural cennau)

  1. lichen
  2. scurf, slough, dandruff
  3. scale on a plant or in a furnace
  4. (chemistry) fur

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cen gen nghen chen
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.