Open main menu
U+33D5, ㏕
SQUARE MIL

[U+33D4]
CJK Compatibility
[U+33D6]

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mil (plural mils)

  1. An angular mil, a unit of angular measurement equal to 16400 of a complete circle. At 1000 metres one mil subtends about one metre (0.98 m). Also 16000 and 16300 are used in other countries.
  2. A unit of measurement equal to 11000 of an inch, usually used for thin objects, such as sheets of plastic.
  3. a former subdivision (1/1000) of the Maltese lira
  4. (informal, plural "mil") Abbreviation of million.
    • 2009, Bob Frey, The DVD Murders (page 39)
      The cheapest shack in this part of the woods would probably set the buyer back at least a couple of mil.
    • 2010 September, Galen Gondolfi, "Idea Fun(d)", St. Louis magazine, ISSN 1090-5723, volume 16, issue 9, page 79:
      You can get things done without money, but you can do a hell of a lot more with it, and $10 mil is a good starting point.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

Asturian cardinal numbers
 <  999 1000 1001  > 
    Cardinal : mil
    Ordinal : milésimu

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mīlle.

NumeralEdit

mil (indeclinable)

  1. (cardinal) one thousand; 1000
    mil llobosone thousand wolves
    mil vaquesone thousand cows

Usage notesEdit

In compound numbers, mil does not inflect or change:

  • mil dosone thousand two
  • mil trenta y nueveone thousand thirty-nine
  • tres milthree thousand
  • venti miltwenty thousand

BretonEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin mīlia.

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) thousand

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Breton mil, from Proto-Brythonic *mil (compare Cornish myl, Welsh mil), from Proto-Celtic *mīlom (compare Old Irish míl and its descendants; Irish míol, Scottish Gaelic míl, Manx meeyl), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)meh₁l- (small animal”).

Compare Ancient Greek μῆλον (mêlon, lamb), Armenian մալ (mal, sheep; mutton; wether; cattle; livestock), Central Kurdish ماڵ‎(mall‎, livestock), Dutch maal (calf).

NounEdit

mil ? (plural miled)

  1. (rare) animal
SynonymsEdit

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin mīlle, from Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂ (one thousand).

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

Catalan cardinal numbers
 <  999 1000 1001  > 
    Cardinal : mil
    Ordinal : milè
Catalan Wikipedia article on mil

mil m or f

  1. (cardinal) thousand

NounEdit

mil m (plural mils)

  1. thousand

Further readingEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish mil, from Old Spanish mil, mill, from Latin mīlle.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: mil

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) thousand

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:mil.


ChavacanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish mil (thousand).

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) thousand

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mel.

NounEdit

mil m

  1. honey

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mil

  1. mile, unit of length of varying value

DeclensionEdit


EsperantoEdit

Esperanto cardinal numbers
 <  999 1000 1001  > 
    Cardinal : mil
    Ordinal : mila
    Adverbial : mile
    Multiplier : milobla
    Fractional : milona

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mille.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mil/
  • (file)

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) thousand

EstonianEdit

ConjunctionEdit

mil

  1. Clipping of millal.
  2. when
    Kord tuleb päev, mil tuleb minna.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

AdverbEdit

mil

  1. Clipping of millel.
  2. what
    Tänaval oli auto, mil olid punased triibud.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin milium, from Proto-Indo-European *melh₂- (to grind, crush).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mil m (plural mils)

  1. (now dialectal) millet

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mīlle.

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) thousand

GalicianEdit

Galician cardinal numbers
 <  999 1000 1001  > 
    Cardinal : mil
    Ordinal : milésimo
 
Carro
 
Carro

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese mil, from Latin mīlle, from Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂ (one thousand).

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

mil (indeclinable)

  1. (cardinal) one thousand; 1000

Etymology 2Edit

1474. From Vulgar Latin *medianile, from Latin medianus. Compare the cognates mión and molo.[1]

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mil m (plural miles)

  1. central piece of the Galician cart wheel
    • 1474, A. López Ferreiro (ed.), Galicia Histórica. Colección diplomática. Santiago: Tipografía Galaica, page 66:
      Iten, preçaron hun rrodisioe dous miilles de carro em noventa maravedis
      Item, they appraised a water wheel and two wheel centers of a cart in ninety maravedis
    Synonyms: mión, miúl, molo

ReferencesEdit

  • mil” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • miil” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • mil” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • mil” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • mil” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mil” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Cf. Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997). Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico. Madrid: Gredos, s.v. medio.

GamilaraayEdit

NounEdit

mil

  1. eye

IdoEdit

Ido cardinal numbers
 <  999 1000 1001  > 
    Cardinal : mil
    Ordinal : milesma
    Adverbial : milfoye
    Multiplier : milopla
    Fractional : milima

EtymologyEdit

From Esperanto mil, from French mille, Italian mille, Spanish mil, from Latin mīlle.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) thousand.

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish mil, from Proto-Celtic *meli, from Proto-Indo-European *mélid. Cognate with Latin mel, Ancient Greek μέλι (méli). Akin to milis and blas.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mil f (genitive singular meala)

  1. honey

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mil mhil not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • mil” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese mil.

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) thousand (1000)

KurdishEdit

NounEdit

mil ?

  1. arm
  2. shoulder
  3. neck

LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mel, mellis.

NounEdit

mil ? (plural [please provide])

  1. honey

LuleEdit

PronounEdit

mil

  1. you (plural)

ReferencesEdit

  • Antonio Maccioni / Machoni, Arte y vocabulario de la lengua lule y tonocoté (1732)

NgiyambaaEdit

NounEdit

mil

  1. (anatomy) eye

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Latin milia, millia and Old Norse míla

NounEdit

mil m or f (definite singular mila or milen, indefinite plural mil, definite plural milene)

  1. (today in Norway) a distance of 10 kilometres
  2. gammel norsk mil - old Norwegian mile, a distance of 11.3 kilometres
  3. engelsk mil - a mile, 1.609 kilometres, as used in Britain and the US.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Latin milia, millia and Old Norse míla

NounEdit

mil m or f (definite singular mila, indefinite plural mil, definite plural milene)

  1. (today in Norway) a distance of 10 kilometres
  2. gammal norsk mil - old Norwegian mile, a distance of 11.3 kilometres
  3. engelsk mil - a mile, 1.609 kilometres, as used in Britain and the US.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


NovialEdit

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) (a) thousand

OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mīlle.

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. thousand

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 648.

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mīlia, plural of the numeral mīlle.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mīl f

  1. mile

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. Alternative form of mile (thousand)

PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish mil and Portuguese mil and Kabuverdianu mil.

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) thousand (1000)

PortugueseEdit

Portuguese cardinal numbers
 <  999 1000 1001  > 
    Cardinal : mil
    Ordinal : milésimo
Portuguese Wikipedia article on mil

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mil, from Latin mīlle, from Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂ (one thousand).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mil m or f

  1. one thousand; a thousand; 1000
  2. (somewhat poetic) thousands of (very many)

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:mil.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish mil (genitive mela), from Proto-Celtic *meli, from Proto-Indo-European *mélid. Cognate with Welsh mêl, Cornish mill, Breton mel, Latin mel, Greek μέλι (méli), Gothic 𐌼𐌹𐌻𐌹𐌸 (miliþ), Old Armenian մեղր (mełr).

NounEdit

mil f (genitive singular mealach)

  1. honey

Related termsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
mil mhil
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • mil” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *milъ. Cognate with Polish miły.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

míl (comparative milêjši, superlative nàjmilêjši)

  1. kind
  2. dear

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

Spanish cardinal numbers
 <  999 1000 1001  > 
    Cardinal : mil
    Ordinal : milésimo

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish mil, mill, from Latin mīlle, from Proto-Italic *smīɣeslī, from Proto-Indo-European *smih₂ǵʰéslih₂ (one thousand).

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

mil (plural miles)

  1. (cardinal) thousand

Usage notesEdit

  • In definite numbers, the plural miles is never used:
dos mil pesos – "two thousand pesos" ($2,000)
cien mil pesos – "a hundred thousand pesos" ($100,000)
  • Miles is only used in the indefinite sense:
miles de pesos – "thousands of pesos"

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mil c

  1. (After 1889) Unit of length, equal to 10,000 meters
  2. (Between 1699 and 1889) Unit of length, equal to 10,688.54 meters.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mil 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mil milen mil milen
Genitive mils milens mils milens

SynonymsEdit


TatarEdit

NounEdit

mil

  1. (archaic) a unit of length: 1 mil = 7 çaqrım = 7.467 km (see Obsolete Tatar units of measurement)

DeclensionEdit


TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mil (definite accusative mili, plural miller)

  1. mile (measure of length)


This Turkish entry was created from the translations listed at mile. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see mil in the Turkish Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) September 2009


VolapükEdit

NumeralEdit

mil

  1. (cardinal) thousand

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Brythonic *mil (compare Cornish myl, Breton mil), from Proto-Celtic *mīlom (compare Old Irish míl and its descendants; Irish míol, Scottish Gaelic míl, Manx meeyl), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)meh₁l- (small animal”).

Compare Ancient Greek μῆλον (mêlon, lamb), Armenian մալ (mal, sheep; mutton; wether; cattle; livestock), Central Kurdish ماڵ(mall, livestock), Dutch maal (calf).

NounEdit

mil m (plural milod)

  1. animal, beast, creature
  2. animal not usually consumed by man
Derived termsEdit
  • carfil m (working beast, dray horse, clumsy animal, monster)
  • milyn (diminutive)

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin mīlle.

NumeralEdit

mil f (plural miloedd)

  1. (cardinal) thousand
Related termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
mil fil unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • Angharad Fychan and Ann Parry Owen, editors (2014), chapter MIL, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

WiradhuriEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mil

  1. (anatomy) eye

YapeseEdit

VerbEdit

mil

  1. to run