See also: Chaos, CHAOS, and chãos

EnglishEdit

 Chaos (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos, vast chasm, void).

In Early Modern English, used in the sense of the original Greek word. In the meaning "primordial matter" from the 16th century. Figurative usage in the sense "confusion, disorder" from the 17th century. The technical sense in mathematics and science dates from the 1960s.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkeɪ.ɒs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkeɪ.ɑs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪɒs

NounEdit

chaos (usually uncountable, plural chaoses)

  1. The unordered state of matter in classical accounts of cosmogony.
  2. Any state of disorder; a confused or amorphous mixture or conglomeration.
    to descend into chaos
    After the earthquake, the local hospital was in chaos
    • 1977, Irwin Edman, Adam, the Baby, and the Man from Mars, page 54:
      or out of these chaoses order may be made, out of this ferment a clear wine of life. There are chaoses that have gone too far for retrieval
  3. (mathematics) A behaviour of iterative non-linear systems in which arbitrarily small variations in initial conditions become magnified over time.
  4. (fantasy) One of the two metaphysical forces of the world in some fantasy settings, as opposed to law.
  5. (obsolete) A vast chasm or abyss.
  6. (obsolete, rare) A given medium; a space in which something exists or lives; an environment.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970:
      , II.ii.3:
      What is the centre of the earth? is it pure element only, as Aristotle decrees, inhabited (as Paracelsus thinks) with creatures whose chaos is the earth: or with fairies, as the woods and waters (according to him) are with nymphs, or as the air with spirits?

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • (classical cosmogony): cosmos
  • (state of disorder): order

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch chaos, from Middle Dutch caos, from Latin chaos, from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos).

NounEdit

chaos (uncountable)

  1. chaos (disorder)
  2. (cosmogony) primordial disorder

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek χάος (kháos, vast chasm, void).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chaos m

  1. chaos

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • chaos in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • chaos in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch caos, from Latin chaos, from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈxaː.ɔs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: cha‧os

NounEdit

chaos m (uncountable)

  1. chaos (disorder)
    Synonyms: baaierd, rommel, wanorde, warboel
  2. (cosmogony) primordial disorder

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: chaos
  • West Frisian: gaos
  • Indonesian: kaos

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin chaos, from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chaos m (uncountable)

  1. chaos

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chaos n sg (genitive chaī); second declension

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Chaos

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter, Greek-type), singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative chaos
Genitive chaī
Dative chaō
Accusative chaos
Ablative chaō
Vocative chaos

ReferencesEdit

  • chaos”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • chaos”, in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • chaos”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • chaos”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin chaos, from Ancient Greek χάος (kháos).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chaos m inan

  1. chaos

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • chaos in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • chaos in Polish dictionaries at PWN

SlovakEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chaos m (genitive singular chaosu, nominative plural chaosy, genitive plural chaosov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. chaos

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • chaos in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk