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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dʌb/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Etymology 1Edit

From a Late Old English (11th century) word dubban (to knight by striking with a sword) perhaps borrowed from Old French aduber, adober "equip with arms; adorn" (also 11th century, Modern French adouber), from Frankish *dubban, from Proto-Germanic *dubjaną (to fit), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (plug, peg, wedge).

Cognate with Icelandic dubba (dubba til riddara). Compare also drub for an English reflex of the Germanic word.

VerbEdit

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (transitive) (now historical) To confer knighthood; the conclusion of the ceremony was marked by a tap on the shoulder with a sword.
  2. (transitive) To name, to entitle, to call. [from the later 16th c]
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter V, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      As a matter of fact its narrow ornate façade presented not a single quiet space that the eyes might rest on after a tiring attempt to follow and codify the arabesques, foliations, and intricate vermiculations of what some disrespectfully dubbed as “near-aissance.”
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70:
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. Piling debt onto companies’ balance-sheets is only a small part of what leveraged buy-outs are about, they insist. Improving the workings of the businesses they take over is just as core to their calling, if not more so. Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster.
  3. (transitive) To deem.
  4. To clothe or invest; to ornament; to adorn.
    • Morte d'Arthure
      His diadem was dropped down / Dubbed with stones.
  5. (heading) To strike, rub, or dress smooth; to dab.
    1. To dress with an adze.
      to dub a stick of timber smooth
    2. To strike cloth with teasels to raise a nap.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
    3. To rub or dress with grease, as leather in the process of currying it.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Tomlinson to this entry?)
    4. To dress a fishing fly.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  6. To prepare (a gamecock) for fighting, by trimming the hackles and cutting off the comb and wattles.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

1505-1515 This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

VerbEdit

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To make a noise by brisk drumbeats.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      Now the drum dubs.
  2. To do something badly.
  3. In golf, to execute a shot poorly.

NounEdit

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (rare) A blow, thrust, or poke.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hudibras to this entry?)

Etymology 3Edit

1885-90; Imitative, see also flub, flubdub

NounEdit

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (now historical) (slang) An unskillful, awkward person. [from the later part of the 19th c]
    • 1936, P. G. Wodehouse, There's Always Golf[1], London: The Strand Magazine:
      As I came over the hill, I saw Ernest Plinlimmon and his partner, in whom I recognized a prominent local dub, emerging from the rough on the right. Apparently, the latter had sliced from the tee, and Ernest had been helping him find his ball.

Etymology 4Edit

From a shortening of the word double.

VerbEdit

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To add sound to film or change audio on film. [from the first half of the 20th c]
  2. To make a copy from an original or master audio tape.
  3. To replace the original soundtrack of a film with a synchronized translation
  4. To mix audio tracks to produce a new sound; to remix.
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (music) A mostly instrumental remix with all or part of the vocals removed.
  2. (music) A style of reggae music involving mixing of different audio tracks.
  3. (music) A growing trend of music from 2009 to current in which bass distortion is synced off timing to electronic dance music.
  4. (slang) A piece of graffiti in metallic colour with a thick black outline.
    • 2001, Nancy Macdonald, The Graffiti Subculture (page 84)
      [] we climbed up the scaffolding and did these gold little dubs and you couldn't see them.
    • 2011, Justin Rollins, The Lost Boyz: A Dark Side of Graffiti (page 34)
      The year 1998 was alive with graffiti and trains pulling up with dubs on their sides.
  5. The replacement of a voice part in a movie or cartoon, particularly with a translation; dubbing.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 5Edit

From Celtic; compare Irish dobhar (water), Welsh dŵr (water).

NounEdit

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) A pool or puddle.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

Etymology 6Edit

From shortening of double dime (twenty).

NounEdit

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (slang) A twenty dollar sack of marijuana.
  2. (slang) A wheel rim measuring 20 inches or more.

Etymology 7Edit

From dup (to open), from do + up, from Middle English don up (to open).

VerbEdit

dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) To open or close.
    • 1828, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward, chapter LXXXIII, in Pelham: or The Adventures of a Gentleman[2], page 402:
      "Crash the cull—down with him—down with him before he dubs the jigger. Tip him the degan, Fib, fake him through and through; if he pikes we shall all be scragged."

NounEdit

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) A lock.
  2. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) A key, especially a master key; a lockpick.
    • 1789, Parker, George, Life's Painter of Variegated Characters in Public and Private Life, page 162:
      [] going upon the dobbin, is a woman dressed like a servant maid, no hat nor cloak on, a bunch of young dubs by her side, which are a bunch of small keys []
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ (oak tree, oak)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dub m inan

  1. oak, oak tree

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dub m

  1. oak

DeclensionEdit


Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *dubus (black), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (black, deep).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dub

  1. black
  2. morally dark, dire, gloomy, melancholy

InflectionEdit

u-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative dub dub dub
Vocative dub
Accusative dub dub
Genitive duib dubae duib
Dative dub dub dub
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative dubai dubai
Vocative dubai
Accusative dubai
Genitive *
Dative dubaib
Notes *not attested in Old Irish; same as nominative singular masculine in Middle Irish

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: dubh
  • Scottish Gaelic: dubh
  • Manx: doo

NounEdit

dub n (genitive dubo)

  1. black pigment, ink
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 15a10
      ó dub glosses atramento
    • c. 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 13d1
      in maith a n-dubso amne
      is this ink good thus?
  2. gall

InflectionEdit

Neuter u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative dubN
Vocative dubN
Accusative dubN
Genitive dubo, duba
Dative dubL
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
dub dub
pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndub
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰanw-.

NounEdit

dub m (Cyrillic spelling дуб)

  1. (Croatia, archaic) oak (wood)
  2. (Croatia, archaic) oak tree
    • c. 1840, Dragutin Rakovac (translating Samuel Tomášik), Hej, Slaveni:
      Stijena puca, dub se lama, zemlja nek’ se trese!
      The rock cracks, the oak breaks, let the earth quake!

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dub m (genitive singular duba, nominative plural duby, genitive plural dubov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. oak, oak tree

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • dub in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

dub m (plural dubs)

  1. (music) dub

VolapükEdit

PrepositionEdit

dub

  1. due to, because of

Derived termsEdit