See also: Dub, DUB, dub-, and Dub.

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From a Late Old English (11th century) word dubban, dubbian (to knight by striking with a sword) perhaps borrowed from Old French adober (equip with arms; adorn) (also 11th century, Modern French adouber, from Proto-Germanic *dubjaną (to fit), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (plug, peg, wedge).

Cognate with Icelandic dubba (dubba til riddara). Compare also drub for an English reflex of the Germanic word.

Verb

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dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (transitive) (now historical or ceremonial) To confer knighthood; the conclusion of the ceremony was marked by a tap on the shoulder with a sword.
  2. (transitive) To name, to entitle, to call. [from the later 16th c]
    • 1907 August, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, chapter V, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, →OCLC:
      As a matter of fact its narrow ornate façade presented not a single quiet space that the eyes might rest on after a tiring attempt to follow and codify the arabesques, foliations, and intricate vermiculations of what some disrespectfully dubbed as “near-aissance.”
    • 2013 June 22, “Engineers of a different kind”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 70:
      Private-equity nabobs bristle at being dubbed mere financiers. Piling debt onto companies’ balance-sheets is only a small part of what leveraged buy-outs are about, they insist. Improving the workings of the businesses they take over is just as core to their calling, if not more so. Much of their pleading is public-relations bluster.
    • 2023 December 27, Stephen Roberts, “Bradshaw's Britain: the way to Weymouth”, in RAIL, number 999, page 52:
      Stephen reigned from 1135-1154, that nasty period of our history dubbed 'The Anarchy', when forces loyal to Stephen contested the throne with those of Henry I's daughter Matilda, who by rights should have been queen. Stephen, her cousin, plonked his own posterior on the throne.
  3. (transitive) To deem.
    • 1733–1737, Alexander Pope, [Imitations of Horace], London: [] R[obert] Dodsley [et al.]:
      A man of wealth is dubbed a man of worth.
  4. To clothe or invest; to ornament; to adorn.
  5. (heading) To strike, rub, or dress smooth; to dab.
    1. To dress with an adze.
      to dub a stick of timber smooth
    2. To strike cloth with teasels to raise a nap.
      • 1808, Annual Register:
        For dressing or dubbing cloths, either wet or dry, otherwise than by green cards and pickards
    3. To rub or dress with grease, as leather in the process of currying it.
      • 1852-1866, Charles Tomlinson, Cyclopaedia of Useful Arts and Manufactures
        When the skin is thoroughly cleansed, and while yet in its wet and distended state, the process of stuffing, or dubbing (probably a corruption of daubing), is performed. Both sides of the skin, but chiefly the flesh side, are smeared or daubed with a mixture of cod-oil and tallow
    4. To dress a fishing fly.
      • 1689, James Chetham, The Anglers Vade Mecum:
        if you can dub a Fly of the exact colour of the Natural Fly, Fish at that instant take, it's sufficient
  6. To prepare (a gamecock) for fighting, by trimming the hackles and cutting off the comb and wattles.
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 2

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1505-1515 This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Verb

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dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To make a noise by brisk drumbeats.
  2. To do something badly.
  3. (golf) To execute a shot poorly.

Noun

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dub (plural dubs)

  1. (rare) A blow, thrust, or poke.
  2. (golf) A poorly executed shot.

Etymology 3

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1885-90. Imitative; see also flub, flubdub.

Noun

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dub (plural dubs)

  1. (slang, now historical) An unskillful, awkward person. [from the later part of the 19th c]
    • 1936, P. G. Wodehouse, There's Always Golf[1], London: The Strand Magazine:
      As I came over the hill, I saw Ernest Plinlimmon and his partner, in whom I recognized a prominent local dub, emerging from the rough on the right. Apparently, the latter had sliced from the tee, and Ernest had been helping him find his ball.
    • 1969, Robert L. Vann, The Competitor, volumes 2-3, page 135:
      The miser, a-seeking lost gelt, / The doughboy, awaiting the battle, / May possibly know how I felt / While the long years dragged by as the dealer / As slow as the slowest of dubs, / Stuck out the last helping of tickets / 'Till I lifted—the Bullet of Clubs!

Etymology 4

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From a shortening of the word double.

Verb

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dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To add sound to film or change audio on film. [from the first half of the 20th c]
  2. To make a copy from an original or master audio tape.
  3. To replace the original soundtrack of a film with a synchronized translation
  4. To mix audio tracks to produce a new sound; to remix.
Derived terms
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Translations
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See also
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Noun

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dub (countable and uncountable, plural dubs)

  1. (music, countable) A mostly instrumental remix with all or part of the vocals removed.
  2. (music, uncountable) A style of reggae music involving mixing of different audio tracks.
  3. (music, uncountable) A trend in music starting in 2009, in which bass distortion is synced off timing to electronic dance music.
    • 2019 January 18, Jamie Dickson, “Khruangbin: “We’re not intending to create war with our music… It’s the absence of that aggression that a lot of rock bands have””, in Music Radar:
      But I think my bass playing is definitely dub-influenced.
    • 2020 July 20, Arun Chakal, “The Worked-Up Sound of Drum & Bass in Russia and Eastern Europe”, in Bandcamp Daily:
      Dyl’s polyrhythmic grooves on The Subsurface Project fuse dub techno and drum & bass, mixing modular sounds with hints of warm, jittery jungle.
    • 2020 August 3, Kane, “The Extended Cut: Zero T - Former Self EP [The North Quarter]”, in Magnetic Magazine:
      It reminded me of that classic Full Cycle vibe of jazzy soulful sounds blending with dub bass and fx.
  4. (slang, countable) A piece of graffiti in metallic colour with a thick black outline.
    • 2001, Nancy Macdonald, The Graffiti Subculture, page 84:
      [] we climbed up the scaffolding and did these gold little dubs and you couldn't see them.
    • 2011, Justin Rollins, The Lost Boyz: A Dark Side of Graffiti, page 34:
      The year 1998 was alive with graffiti and trains pulling up with dubs on their sides.
  5. (countable) The replacement of a voice part in a movie or cartoon, particularly with a translation; an instance of dubbing.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 5

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From Celtic; compare Irish dobhar (water), Welsh dŵr (water).

Noun

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dub (plural dubs)

  1. (UK, dialect) A pool or puddle.

Etymology 6

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From shortening of double dime (twenty).

Noun

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dub (plural dubs)

  1. (slang) A twenty-dollar sack of marijuana.
  2. (slang) A wheel rim measuring 20 inches or more.
Derived terms
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Etymology 7

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From dup (to open), from do + up, from Middle English don up (to open).

Verb

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dub (third-person singular simple present dubs, present participle dubbing, simple past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (obsolete, UK, thieves' cant) To open or close.
    • 1828, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, chapter LXXXIII, in Pelham: or The Adventures of a Gentleman[2], page 402:
      "Crash the cull—down with him—down with him before he dubs the jigger. Tip him the degan, Fib, fake him through and through; if he pikes we shall all be scragged."
Derived terms
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Noun

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dub (plural dubs)

  1. (obsolete, UK, thieves' cant) A lock.
  2. (obsolete, UK, thieves' cant) A key, especially a master key; a lock pick.
    • 1789, George Parker, Life's Painter of Variegated Characters in Public and Private Life, page 162:
      [] going upon the dobbin, is a woman dressed like a servant maid, no hat nor cloak on, a bunch of young dubs by her side, which are a bunch of small keys []
Derived terms
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Etymology 8

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Noun

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dub (plural dubs)

  1. Clipping of double-u.
    • 1997, Nelson Howell, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Microsoft Visual InterDev, Que Pub, →ISBN:
      World Wide Web or WWW
      Pronouncing this "dub dub dub" (with no rub-a) will definitely establish you as an insider.
    • 2018, Corey Pein, Live Work Work Work Die: A Journey into the Savage Heart of Silicon Valley, Metropolitan Books, →ISBN, page 119:
      I once met a gaggle of Aussies who'd paid thousands of dollars out of their own pockets for airfare and registration to attend an annual Apple convention called the Worldwide Developers Conference, or WWDC—or, in this crowd, “Dub Dub.”
    1. (video games, Internet slang) A win.
      I haven't had a dub in a few games
Derived terms
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Etymology 9

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Noun

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dub (plural dubs)

  1. (India, historical) A small copper coin once used in India.
References
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See also

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terms which are probably etymologically unrelated

Anagrams

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Czech

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Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology

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Inherited from Old Czech dub, from Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ (oak tree, oak).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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dub m inan

  1. oak, oak tree

Declension

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • dub in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • dub in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • dub in Internetová jazyková příručka

Anagrams

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Lower Sorbian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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dub m inan

  1. oak

Declension

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Further reading

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  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928) “dub”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999) “dub”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Old Czech

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ (oak tree, oak).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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dub m inan

  1. oak, oak tree

Declension

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Descendants

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  • Czech: dub

Further reading

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Old Irish

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Etymology

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From Proto-Celtic *dubus (black), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ- (black, deep).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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dub

  1. black
  2. morally dark, dire, gloomy, melancholy

Inflection

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u-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative dub dub dub
Vocative dub
Accusative dub duib
Genitive duib dubae duib
Dative dub duib dub
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative dubai dubai
Vocative dubai
Accusative dubai
Genitive *
Dative dubaib
Notes *not attested in Old Irish; same as nominative singular masculine in Middle Irish

Descendants

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Noun

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dub n (genitive dubo)

  1. black pigment, ink
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 15a10
      ó dub glosses atramento
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 13d1
      in maith a n-dubso amne
      is this ink good thus?
    • c. 845, St Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 217a
      Memmbrum naue, droch dub! Ó, ní epur na haill.
      New parchment, bad ink! Oh, I say nothing more.
  2. gall

Inflection

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Neuter u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative dubN
Vocative dubN
Accusative dubN
Genitive duboH, dubaH
Dative dubL
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Mutation

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Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
dub dub
pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndub
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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San Juan Guelavía Zapotec

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Etymology

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From Proto-Zapotec *tokwaʔ.

Noun

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dub

  1. agave

References

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  • López Antonio, Joaquín, Jones, Ted, Jones, Kris (2012) Vocabulario breve del Zapoteco de San Juan Guelavía[3] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Tlalpan, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., pages 14, 26

Serbo-Croatian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰanw-.

Noun

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dub m (Cyrillic spelling дуб)

  1. (Croatia, archaic) oak (wood)
  2. (Croatia, archaic) oak tree
    Synonym: hrast
    • c. 1840, Dragutin Rakovac (translating Samuel Tomášik), Hej, Slaveni:
      Stijena puca, dub se lama, zemlja nek’ se trese!
      The rock cracks, the oak breaks, let the earth quake!

Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • dub” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • dub” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • dub” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Slovak

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Slovak Wikipedia has an article on:
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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *dǫbъ.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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dub m inan (genitive singular duba, nominative plural duby, genitive plural dubov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. oak, oak tree

Declension

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • dub”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Spanish

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Noun

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dub m (plural dubs)

  1. (music) dub

Sumerian

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Romanization

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dub

  1. Romanization of 𒁾 (dub)

Volapük

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Preposition

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dub

  1. due to, because of

Derived terms

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White Hmong

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Etymology

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From Proto-Hmong *qrɛŋᴬ (black), related to Proto-Mien *qri̯ɛkᴰ (black), though the details are unclear due to irregular rime and tone correspondences.[1]

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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dub

  1. black
  2. dark

References

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  • Heimbach, Ernest E. (1979) White Hmong — English Dictionary[4], SEAP Publications, →ISBN.
  1. ^ Ratliff, Martha (2010) Hmong-Mien language history (Studies in Language Change; 8), Camberra, Australia: Pacific Linguistics, →ISBN, page 243; 274.

Zhuang

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-Tai *dupᴬ (to pound); cognate with Thai ทุบ (túp), Lao ທຸບ (thup), Shan ထုပ်ႉ (thṵ̂p). Also compare Cantonese 𢱕 (dap6, “to pound; to strike”).

Verb

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dub (Sawndip forms 𭡡 or 𰔥 or 𭡫, 1957–1982 spelling dub)

  1. to hit; to strike
    Synonym: moeb
  2. to strike with a hammer; to hammer
  3. to castrate (a male water buffalo)

Etymology 2

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Verb

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dub (1957–1982 spelling dub)

  1. to harrow (a paddy)