Translingual edit

Symbol edit

chu

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Old Church Slavonic.

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From the Japanese ちゅっ (chu', onomatopoeia).

Interjection edit

chu

  1. (anime and manga fandom slang) The sound of a kiss.
    • 1996 August 12, Kathleen Webb, “Re: Zoicite a guy!!!”, in alt.fan.sailor-moon[1] (Usenet):
      By the way, isn't it interesting that the Japanese hear the sound "chu" when someone kisses? In the US, we usually say, "smooch," "smack," "smerp," or even "swock." Now, everytime[sic] I kiss my husband, I'm listening to hear if it sounds like "chu."
    • 2000 August 4, Fish Eye no Miko [username], “Re: [POLL] Which anime characters could be Ohtori students?”, in alt.fan.utena[2] (Usenet):
      >Eldrick Tobin - Kiss worthiness of sig pending.

      <chu!>
      Seems fine to me. ^_^
    • 2000 August 19, Verthandi, “Re: [META] Ohha! Gally desu!”, in alt.fan.utena[3] (Usenet):
      movie Akio: [shoots a kiss to himself] Chu! ^.~

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation spelling of you, especially when preceded by a t sound.

Pronoun edit

chu

  1. (slang, nonstandard) You.
    Synonym: cha

Chipewyan edit

Adverb edit

chu

  1. also

Esperanto edit

Particle edit

chu

  1. H-system spelling of ĉu

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old French cheü, chaü, from Vulgar Latin *cadūtus, past participle for Late Latin cadēre, from Latin cadĕre.

Participle edit

chu (feminine chue, masculine plural chus, feminine plural chues)

  1. past participle of choir
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Contraction of je +‎ suis.

Alternative forms edit

Phrase edit

chu

  1. (Quebec, colloquial) I am
    Chu vraiment tanné, là!
    I'm real fed up!

Garo edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

chu

  1. beer, alcohol

Guerrero Amuzgo edit

Noun edit

chu

  1. year

Hän edit

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

chu

  1. (Canada) water

Hokkien edit

For pronunciation and definitions of chu – see (“book; codex; letter; document; etc.”).
(This term is the pe̍h-ōe-jī form of ).

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

chu

  1. The hiragana syllable ちゅ (chu) or the katakana syllable チュ (chu) in Hepburn romanization.

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

chu (chu5chu0, Zhuyin ˙ㄔㄨ)

  1. Nonstandard spelling of chū.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of chú.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of chǔ.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of chù.

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Nigerian Pidgin edit

Etymology edit

From English chew.

Verb edit

chu

  1. chew

Norman edit

Adjective edit

chu (masculine before vowel chut, feminine chute, masculine plural chus, feminine plural chutes)

  1. (France, Jersey) this
    Je le viyis chu jouo quaund je feus à la feireI saw him that day as I went to the fair
    • 1903, Edgar MacCulloch, “Proverbs, Weather Sayings, etc.”, in Guernsey Folk Lore[4], page 515:
      Tout chu qui vient de flot se retournera d'ebe.
      All that comes with the flood will return with the ebb.

San Pedro Amuzgos Amuzgo edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

chu (plural ndyu)

  1. year

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Stewart, Cloyd, Stewart, Ruth D., colaboradores amuzgos (2000) Diccionario amuzgo de San Pedro Amuzgos, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 44)‎[5] (in Spanish), Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., →ISBN

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Verb edit

chu

  1. (of lips) to protrude

Etymology 2 edit

Romanization edit

chu

  1. Sino-Vietnamese reading of
Derived terms edit

Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

chu

  1. Aspirate mutation of cu.

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cu gu nghu chu
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.