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See also: clausurá

Contents

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin clausūra, from Latin clausus. See also the inherited doublet chiusura.

NounEdit

clausura f (plural clausure)

  1. a cloistered life

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Late Latin. From clausus (shut, closed) +‎ -sūra.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clausūra f (genitive clausūrae); first declension

(Late Latin)

  1. lock, bar, bolt
  2. clasp (of a necklace)
  3. castle, fort
  4. cloister

InflectionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative clausūra clausūrae
genitive clausūrae clausūrārum
dative clausūrae clausūrīs
accusative clausūram clausūrās
ablative clausūrā clausūrīs
vocative clausūra clausūrae

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • clausura in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • clausura in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin clausūra, from Latin clausus. Compare the inherited doublet chousura.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clausura f (plural clausuras)

  1. clausure, enclosure, claustral confinement
  2. a cloistered life
  3. convent

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /klauˈsuɾa/, [klau̯ˈsuɾa]

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Late Latin clausūra, from Latin clausus.

NounEdit

clausura f (plural clausuras)

  1. closing, closure (the end or conclusion of something)
    Synonyms: cierre
    Antonyms: apertura
  2. closed monastery or convent
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See etymology on the main entry.

VerbEdit

clausura

  1. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of clausurar.
  2. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of clausurar.

Further readingEdit