See also: Bolt, Bôłt, bòlt, and bolț

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
a fastening bolt with nut
 
Bolt-DIN 933-M10-20
 
Bolt DIN
 
a door bolt
 
bolts of fabric
 
(carrier) bolt of a M16 rifle
 
bolts of lightning

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bɒlt/, /bəʊlt/, /bɔʊlt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /boʊlt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊlt, -ɒlt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bolt, from Old English bolt, from Proto-Germanic *bultaz, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeld- (to knock, strike). Compare Lithuanian beldu (I knock), baldas (pole for striking).[1] Akin to Dutch and West Frisian bout, German Bolz or Bolzen, Danish bolt, Swedish bult, Icelandic bolti.

NounEdit

bolt (plural bolts)

  1. A (usually) metal fastener consisting of a cylindrical body that is threaded, with a larger head on one end. It can be inserted into an unthreaded hole up to the head, with a nut then threaded on the other end; a heavy machine screw.
  2. A sliding pin or bar in a lock or latch mechanism.
  3. A bar of wood or metal dropped in horizontal hooks on a door and adjoining wall or between the two sides of a double door, to prevent the door(s) from being forced open.
  4. (military, mechanical engineering) A sliding mechanism to chamber and unchamber a cartridge in a firearm.
  5. A small personal-armour-piercing missile for short-range use, or (in common usage though deprecated by experts) a short arrow, intended to be shot from a crossbow or a catapult.
  6. A lightning spark, i.e., a lightning bolt.
  7. A sudden event, action or emotion.
    The problem's solution struck him like a bolt from the blue.
    • 1994, Stephen Fry, The Hippopotamus Chapter 2
      With a bolt of fright he remembered that there was no bathroom in the Hobhouse Room. He leapt along the corridor in a panic, stopping by the long-case clock at the end where he flattened himself against the wall.
  8. A large roll of fabric or similar material, as a bolt of cloth.
    • 1774 March 24, Stamford Mercury[1]:
      Mr. Cole, Basket-maker...has lost near 300 boults of rods
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, “All Astir”, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299, page 106:
      Not only were the old sails being mended, but new sails were coming on board, and bolts of canvas, and coils of rigging; in short, everything betokened that the ship's preparations were hurrying to a close.
    1. (nautical) The standard linear measurement of canvas for use at sea: 39 yards.
  9. A sudden spring or start; a sudden leap aside.
    The horse made a bolt.
  10. A sudden flight, as to escape creditors.
    • 1887, Chalres Reader and Compton Reade, Charles Reade, Dramatist, Novelist, Journalist: A Memoir
      This gentleman was so hopelessly involved that he contemplated a bolt to America — or anywhere.
  11. (US, politics) A refusal to support a nomination made by the party with which one has been connected; a breaking away from one's party.
  12. An iron to fasten the legs of a prisoner; a shackle; a fetter.
  13. A burst of speed or efficiency.
    • 2018 June 17, Barney Ronay, “Mexico’s Hirving Lozano stuns world champions Germany for brilliant win”, in Katharine Viner, editor, The Guardian[4], London: Guardian News & Media, ISSN 0261-3077, OCLC 229952407, archived from the original on 5 August 2019:
      In the event they lacked a proper midfield bolt, with Toni Kroos and Sami Khedira huffing around in pursuit of the whizzing green machine. The centre-backs looked flustered, left to deal with three on two as Mexico broke. Löw’s 4-2-3-1 seemed antiquated and creaky, with the old World Cup shark Thomas Müller flat-footed in a wide position.
  14. A stalk or scape (of garlic, onion, etc).
    • 2013, Wong Yoon Wah, Durians Are Not the Only Fruit: Notes from the Tropics, Epigram Books (→ISBN)
      All kinds of vegetables may be used as a topping, but the best are strongly flavoured ones without too much moisture, such as celery, garlic bolts, chives, scallions, or various beans (long beans, green beans etc.) ...
    • 2017, Adam Brookes, The Spy's Daughter, Redhook (→ISBN)
      She ordered Cat's Ear Noodles heaped with garlic bolts and tomatoes, the broth thick with cumin, laced with black vinegar. The girl caught her accent, the sibilant sing-song of the south, and smiled, tilting her head questioningly.
Derived termsEdit


TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

bolt (third-person singular simple present bolts, present participle bolting, simple past and past participle bolted)

  1. To connect or assemble pieces using a bolt.
    Bolt the vice to the bench.
  2. To secure a door by locking or barring it.
    Bolt the door.
  3. (intransitive) To flee, to depart, to accelerate suddenly.
    Seeing the snake, the horse bolted.
    The actor forgot his line and bolted from the stage.
    • 1627, Michael Drayton, Nymphidia
      This Puck seems but a dreaming dolt, [] / And oft out of a bush doth bolt.
    • 1938, Norman Lindsay, Age of Consent, Sydney: Ure Smith, published 1962, page 87:
      Bradly was embarrassed, detected in the character of a snooper. But he had to come on, short of bolting back in his tracks.
  4. (transitive) To cause to start or spring forth; to dislodge (an animal being hunted).
    to bolt a rabbit
  5. To strike or fall suddenly like a bolt.
  6. (intransitive) To escape.
  7. (intransitive, botany, of lettuce, spinach, garlic, onion, etc) To produce flower stalks and flowers or seeds quickly or prematurely; to form a bolt (stalk or scape); to go to seed.
    Lettuce and spinach will bolt as the weather warms up.
    • 1982, Dorothy Hinshaw Patent, Diane E. Bilderback, Garden Secrets: A Guide to Understanding how Your Garden Grows and how You Can Help it Grow Even Better, →ISBN:
      When an onion bolts and forms a flower stalk, the stem grows right up through the neck, forming a tough, fibrous tube that pierces the center of the bulb. The plant channels all its energy into this flower stalk, so no more fleshy  []
    • 1995, Anne Raver, “Gandhi Gardening”, in Deep in the Green: An Exploration of Country Pleasures, New York, N.Y.: Alfred A. Knopf, →ISBN:
      To be honest, this hasn't been my Garden of Eden year. [] The lettuce turned bitter and bolted. The Green Comet broccoli was good, but my coveted Romanescos never headed up.
    • 2011, Trina Clickner, A Miscellany of Garlic: From Paying Off Pyramids and Scaring Away Tigers to Inspiring Courage and Curing Hiccups, the Unusual Power Behind the World's Most Humble Vegetable, Simon and Schuster, →ISBN:
      Hardneck garlic bolts, which means it produces a single flower stalk, also known as a scape. It is considered to be far tastier and “gourmet.” You can find hardneck garlic mainly at farmers' markets []
  8. To swallow food without chewing it.
  9. To drink one's drink very quickly; to down a drink.
    Come on, everyone, bolt your drinks; I want to go to the next pub!
  10. (US, politics) To refuse to support a nomination made by a party or caucus with which one has been connected; to break away from a party.
  11. To utter precipitately; to blurt or throw out.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdverbEdit

bolt (not comparable)

  1. Suddenly; straight; unbendingly.
    The soldiers stood bolt upright for inspection.
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English bulten, from Anglo-Norman buleter, Old French bulter (modern French bluter), from a Germanic source originally meaning "bag, pouch" cognate with Middle High German biuteln (to sift), from Proto-Germanic *buzdô (beetle, grub, swelling), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūs- (to move quickly). Cognate with Dutch buidel.

VerbEdit

bolt (third-person singular simple present bolts, present participle bolting, simple past and past participle bolted)

  1. To sift, especially through a cloth.
  2. To sift the bran and germ from wheat flour.
    Graham flour is unbolted flour; in contrast, some other flours have been bolted.
  3. To separate, assort, refine, or purify by other means.
  4. (law) To discuss or argue privately, and for practice, as cases at law.
    • 1781, “The History and Antiquities of the Four Inns of Court”, in The Monthly Review:
      [] the old habits of mooting or bolting caſes (i.e. of public disputations), might make the ſtudent more ſubtle and acute
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

bolt (plural bolts)

  1. A sieve, especially a long fine sieve used in milling for bolting flour and meal; a bolter.
    • 1885, Canada. Patent Office, The Canadian Patent Office Record and Register of Copyrights and Trade Marks, page 279:
      The combination, in a flour bolt, of a reel head having a throat near its outer edge for the passage of the tailings and a series of revolving adjustable beaters, substantially as set forth.
    • 1886, The Mechanical News, page 120:
      We have a number of these reels in different mills that are bolting the break flour direct from the scalping reels and scalped through No. 8 cloth. [] Now, gentlemen, they require a much less number to do a given amount of work than any other known machine or bolt, and require less space and power.
    • 1896, United States. Patent Office, Decisions of the Commissioner of Patents and of the United States Courts in Patent and Trade-mark and Copyright Cases., page 493:
      As the material is agitated by the motion of the bolt, the flour falls through, while the smaller particles of bran are taken up by the current of air and carried off.

ReferencesEdit

  • bolt at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Low German bolt, from Middle Low German bolte, from Old Saxon bolt, from Proto-West Germanic *bolt.

NounEdit

bolt c (singular definite bolten, plural indefinite bolte)

  1. a bolt (threaded)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

bolt (imperative bolt, present tense bolter, passive boltes, simple past and past participle bolta or boltet, present participle boltende)

  1. imperative of bolte

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian volta (vault).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bolt (plural boltok)

  1. shop, store (especially applied to relatively small shops in the countryside)
    Synonyms: üzlet, áruház, kereskedés, árus
  2. vault
    Synonyms: boltozat, boltív, bolthajtás

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative bolt boltok
accusative boltot boltokat
dative boltnak boltoknak
instrumental bolttal boltokkal
causal-final boltért boltokért
translative bolttá boltokká
terminative boltig boltokig
essive-formal boltként boltokként
essive-modal
inessive boltban boltokban
superessive bolton boltokon
adessive boltnál boltoknál
illative boltba boltokba
sublative boltra boltokra
allative bolthoz boltokhoz
elative boltból boltokból
delative boltról boltokról
ablative bolttól boltoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
bolté boltoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
boltéi boltokéi
Possessive forms of bolt
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. boltom boltjaim
2nd person sing. boltod boltjaid
3rd person sing. boltja boltjai
1st person plural boltunk boltjaink
2nd person plural boltotok boltjaitok
3rd person plural boltjuk boltjaik

HyponymsEdit

See also the compound words containing -bolt with the sense of a shop [store] below.

Derived termsEdit

Compound words with a meaning unrelated to shops [stores]
Compound words with the sense of a shop [store]

(Note: Most compounds with üzlet as an affix in the sense of ’shop, store’ can be expressed with bolt.)

Further readingEdit

  • (vault): bolt in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (shop, store): bolt in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • bolt in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (’A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2021)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Low German bolt

NounEdit

bolt m (definite singular bolten, indefinite plural bolter, definite plural boltene)

  1. a bolt (threaded)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

bolt

  1. imperative of bolte

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Norwegian boltr, from Middle Low German bolte.

NounEdit

bolt m (definite singular bolten, indefinite plural boltar, definite plural boltane)

  1. a bolt (threaded)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *bolt.

Compare Lithuanian beldu (I knock), baldas (pole for striking).[1] Akin to Dutch bout, German Bolz or Bolzen, Danish bolt, Icelandic bolti.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bolt m

  1. bolt

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: bolt

ReferencesEdit