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Etymology 1Edit

 
Cockles

From Middle English cokel, cokkel, kokkel, cocle, of uncertain origin. Perhaps a diminutive of Middle English cokke, cok (cockle), from Old English cocc (found in sǣcocc (cockle)) +‎ -le; or perhaps from Old French coquille, from Vulgar Latin *cocchilia, form of Latin conchylia, from Ancient Greek κογχύλιον (konkhúlion), diminutive of κογχύλη (konkhúlē, mussel), from Proto-Indo-European *konkho.

NounEdit

 
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cockle (plural cockles)

  1. Any of various edible European bivalve mollusks, of the family Cardiidae, having heart-shaped shells.
  2. The shell of such a mollusk.
  3. (in the plural) One’s innermost feelings (only in the expression “the cockles of one’s heart”).
  4. (directly from French coquille) A wrinkle, pucker
  5. (by extension) A defect in sheepskin; firm dark nodules caused by the bites of keds on live sheep
  6. (mining, Britain, Cornwall) The mineral black tourmaline or schorl.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Raymond to this entry?)
  7. (Britain) The fire chamber of a furnace.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  8. (Britain) A kiln for drying hops; an oast.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  9. (Britain) The dome of a heating furnace.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
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VerbEdit

cockle (third-person singular simple present cockles, present participle cockling, simple past and past participle cockled)

  1. To cause to contract into wrinkles or ridges, as some kinds of cloth after a wetting; to pucker.

Etymology 2Edit

 
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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies

Wikispecies has information on:

Wikispecies From Middle English cockil, cokil, cokylle, from Old English coccel (darnel), of unknown origin, perhaps from a diminutive of Latin coccus (berry).

NounEdit

cockle (plural cockles)

  1. Any of several field weeds, such as the corncockle, Agrostemma githago, and Lolium temulentum.
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