English edit

 
Myrtleford, Victoria, Australia: historic tobacco kiln

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English kilne, from Old English cylene or cyline (large oven), from Latin culīna (kitchen, kitchen stove).

Middle English -ln(e) usually becomes modern -ll as in mill. The pronunciation /kɪln/ may be based on dialects in which this simplification did not take place, but it must have been at least reinforced by spelling pronunciation.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

kiln (plural kilns)

  1. An oven or furnace or a heated chamber, for the purpose of hardening, burning, calcining or drying anything; for example, firing ceramics, curing or preserving tobacco, or drying grain.
    • 2006, Edwin Black, chapter 2, in Internal Combustion[1]:
      One typical Grecian kiln engorged one thousand muleloads of juniper wood in a single burn. Fifty such kilns would devour six thousand metric tons of trees and brush annually.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

kiln (third-person singular simple present kilns, present participle kilning, simple past and past participle kilned)

  1. To bake in a kiln; to fire.
    When making pottery we need to allow the bisque to dry before we kiln it.

References edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Indonesian edit

Etymology edit

From English kiln, from Middle English kilne, from Old English cylene or cyline (large oven), from Latin culīna (kitchen, kitchen stove).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈkɪln], [ˈkɪlə̆n]
  • Hyphenation: kiln

Noun edit

kiln (first-person possessive kilnku, second-person possessive kilnmu, third-person possessive kilnnya)

  1. (archaeology) kiln, an oven or furnace or a heated chamber, for the purpose of hardening, burning, calcining or drying anything; for example, firing ceramics, curing or preserving tobacco, or drying grain.

Further reading edit