EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kʌk/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌk
  • enPR: kŭk, IPA(key): /kʌk/

Etymology 1Edit

Clipping of cuckold. The sense of weakling, race traitor, etc. apparently originated on 4chan in 2014 and migrated to Reddit soon after.[1]

NounEdit

cuck (plural cucks)

  1. (slang) A cuckold.
    • 1706, Edward Ward, Hudibras redivivus, I.10:
      Not the Horn-Plague, but something worse, Had drove the frighted Cucks from thence.
    • 2015, Filipa Jodelka, The Guardian, 17 August:
      We bounce from Bisset and Seymour’s increasingly happy shagging to Worsley, the willing cuck, watching on and, finally, the trial that Worsley brings against Bisset.
  2. (derogatory, slang) A weakling.
    beta cuck (internet slang)
    • 2016, Kumail Nanjiani, quoted in The Guardian, 12 November:
      “He starts getting in my face. Thomas puts his hand on the dude’s chest to stop him. ‘Don’t touch me you cuck. Wanna go outside?’”
    • 2017 August 3, Tim Squirrell, “The evolution of "cuck" shows that different far-right groups are learning the same language”, in New Statesman:
      From there cuck evolved into a catch-all way of abusing men who might be otherwise referred to as “betas”.
    • 2020, "TDO" quoted by Vinny Troia in Hunting Cyber Criminals[1]:
      You're site is SHITE. It gets hacked DAILY. You dumb cuck.
  3. (derogatory, slang) One who acts against one's own interests, or that of one's own race, gender, class, religion, etc.
Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

cuck (third-person singular simple present cucks, present participle cucking, simple past and past participle cucked)

  1. (slang, transitive) To cuckold, to be sexually unfaithful towards.
  2. (slang, transitive, derogatory) To weaken or emasculate.
  3. (slang, transitive, derogatory) To fool and thus lower the status of, to exploit the trust or tolerance of (to one's own benefit and the other's disadvantage); to make into a cuck (one who acts against their own interests).
    • 2016 May 18, Milo Yiannopoulos, "Cucked by Zuck":
      It’s redolent of the way establishment conservatives lost the culture war in the first place, by bowing to the opposition, allowing others to play them for fools, and contenting themselves with the occasional scraps thrown to them by progressive elites. I said “cucked by Zuck” earlier, but in reality, they were cucked a long time ago and by their enemies in the Democratic Party and liberal media.

Etymology 2Edit

Back-formation from cucking stool.

VerbEdit

cuck (third-person singular simple present cucks, present participle cucking, simple past and past participle cucked)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To punish (someone) by putting them in a cucking stool.

ReferencesEdit


YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English cok, from Old English cocc, from Proto-West Germanic *kokk.

NounEdit

cuck

  1. cock (rooster)

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN