despite

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French despit, from Latin dēspectum (looking down on), from dēspiciō (to look down, despise).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dɪˈspaɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪt

PrepositionEdit

despite

  1. In spite of, notwithstanding.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

despite (countable and uncountable, plural despites)

  1. (obsolete) Disdain, contemptuous feelings, hatred.
  2. (archaic) Action or behaviour displaying such feelings; an outrage, insult.
  3. Evil feeling; malice, spite, annoyance.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 2, page 3:
      How often am I obliged to speak mal à propos, because my features are not sufficiently charming in a state of repose!—how often is my ingenuity racked to find a word, when a look would have been far better! I am compelled to be amusing, in my own despite.
    • 1874, translated by Richard Crawley, Thucydides The Peloponnesian War:
      And for these Corcyraeans—neither receive them into alliance in our despite, nor be their abettors in crime.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

despite (third-person singular simple present despites, present participle despiting, simple past and past participle despited)

  1. (obsolete) To vex; to annoy; to offend contemptuously.

ReferencesEdit

  • despite at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • despite in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

AnagramsEdit