EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hatrede, hatreden (hatred), from hate (hate) + -reden (suffix denoting state or condition), equivalent to hate +‎ -red; compare lovered. Related to Icelandic hatri (hatred).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈheɪtɹɪd/
  • (file)

NounEdit

hatred (countable and uncountable, plural hatreds)

  1. Strong aversion; intense dislike
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 34.
      the very circumstance which renders it so innocent is what chiefly exposes it to the public hatred
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 8, in The China Governess[1]:
      It was a casual sneer, obviously one of a long line. There was hatred behind it, but of a quiet, chronic type, nothing new or unduly virulent, and he was taken aback by the flicker of amazed incredulity that passed over the younger man's ravaged face.
    • (Can we date this quote by David Crystal and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Fears and hatreds pay no attention to facts.

Usage notesEdit

The noun hatred is not used as a modifier in compound nouns; instead, its synonym hate is used, as, for example, in hate crime.

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Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

hatred

  1. Alternative form of hatrede