EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*tréyes

From Middle French detester, from Latin detestari (to imprecate evil while calling the gods to witness", "denounce", "hate intensely), from de- + testari (to testify, bear witness), from testis (a witness); see test, testify.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɪˈtɛst/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: de‧test

VerbEdit

detest (third-person singular simple present detests, present participle detesting, simple past and past participle detested)

  1. (transitive) To dislike (someone or something) intensely; to loathe.
    I detest snakes.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To witness against; to denounce; to condemn.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, James Nichols, editor, The Church History of Britain, [], volume (please specify |volume=I to III), new edition, London: [] [James Nichols] for Thomas Tegg and Son, [], published 1837, OCLC 913056315:
      The heresy of Nestorius [] was detested in the Eastern churches.
    • 1545, John Bale, The Image of Both Churches
      God hath detested them with his own mouth.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit