detriment

See also: détriment

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French detriement, from Latin detrimentum (loss, damage, literally a rubbing off), from deterere (to rub off, wear), from de- (down, away) + terere (to rub).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

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Wikipedia

detriment (plural detriments)

  1. Harm, hurt, damage.
    • 1872, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, chapter 7, The Possessed[1]:
      “But marriage in secret, Nikolay Vsyevolodovitch — a fatal secret. I receive money from you, and I'm suddenly asked the question, 'What's that money for?' My hands are tied; I cannot answer to the detriment of my sister, to the detriment of the family honour.”
  2. (UK, obsolete) A charge made to students and barristers for incidental repairs of the rooms they occupy.

Usage notesEdit

  • Often used in the form "to someone's detriment".

SynonymsEdit

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Last modified on 20 April 2014, at 02:00