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See also: putout and put-out

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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

put out (plural put outs)

  1. (baseball) The statistic of the number of outs a defensive player directly caused.
    Jones recorded 15 put outs in the first half of the season.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

put out (comparative more put out, superlative most put out)

  1. Taking offense; indignant.
    He was put out at the mere suggestion of misconduct.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

put out (third-person singular simple present puts out, present participle putting out, simple past and past participle put out)

  1. (transitive, of eyes) To blind.
    You can't have a pair of scissors! You'll put your eye out!
  2. (transitive) To place outside, to remove, particularly
    Don’t forget to put out the dog.
    1. To expel.
      • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 27:
        ‘These guys,’ said Tom, ‘The ones who put out this magazine at Radley. What happened to them?’ ...
        ‘Ah, now, this is why we must proceed with great circumspection. They were both, hum, “put out” themselves. “Booted out” I believe is the technical phrase.’
    2. To remove from office.
  3. (transitive) To cause something to be out, particularly
    1. To cause someone to be out of sorts: to impose, inconvenience, or disturb.
      I don't mean to put you out. It's just vital that I get this done tonight.
    2. (sports) To knock out: to eliminate from a competition.
      • 2011 October 1, Tom Fordyce, “Rugby World Cup 2011: England 16-12 Scotland”, in BBC Sport[1]:
        England stumbled into the World Cup quarter-finals and almost certainly put Scotland out after an error-ridden victory at Eden Park.
    3. (baseball and cricket) To cause a player on offense to be out.
    4. (boxing and medicine) Synonym of knock out: to render unconscious.
  4. (intransitive) To go out, to head out, especially (sailing) to set sail.
  5. (transitive) To cause something to go out, particularly
    1. To produce, to emit.
      The factory puts out 4000 units each day.
      This unit puts out 4000 BTUs.
    2. (obsolete) To express.
    3. To broadcast, to publish.
      • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 27:
        ‘These guys,’ said Tom, ‘The ones who put out this magazine at Radley. What happened to them?’ ...
        ‘Ah, now, this is why we must proceed with great circumspection. They were both, hum, “put out” themselves. “Booted out” I believe is the technical phrase.’
    4. To dislocate (a joint).
      Lift with your knees. Don’t put out your back.
    5. To extinguish (fire).
      They worked for days to put out the brushfire.
      She put out her cigarette.
    6. To turn off (light).
      • 2010, Terry Deary, Put out the Light, p. 10:
        'You talk funny,' I said to him. 'I mean, the other wardens say, "Put that light out", but you shout, "Put out the light".'
        'Shakespeare,' the warden said in a deep voice.
      Put out those lights before the Germans see them.
  6. (intransitive, originally US slang) To consent to sex.
    • 1928 December, Our Army, p. 19:
      Don't them laundry queens put out good enough to suit you?
    • 1961, Joseph Heller, Catch-22, p. 131:
      Aarfy... tried to dissuade them from ever putting out for anyone but their husbands.
    • 1975, David Lodge, Changing Places: A Tale of Two Campuses, p. 232:
      If she won't put out the men will accuse her of being bourgeois and uptight.
    • 2003, Elizabeth M. Noble, Reading Group, p. 205:
      I can't afford to waste a Saturday night here with some married bird who isn't putting out.
    • 2005, William Heffernan, A Time Gone By:
      This Grosso dated this woman a couple of times, and then, when she wouldn't put out for him, he beat her up and forced her.

Usage notesEdit

  • The object in all transitive senses can come before or after the particle. If it is a pronoun, then it must come before the particle.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit