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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English doute (doubt). More at doubt.

NounEdit

dout

  1. Obsolete spelling of doubt

Etymology 2Edit

Blend of do +‎ out, from Middle English don ut (do out). Compare don, doff, dup.

VerbEdit

dout (third-person singular simple present douts, present participle douting, simple past and past participle douted)

  1. (transitive, dialectal or obsolete) To put out; quench; extinguish; douse.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene ii], page 86, column 1:
      Mount them, and make inciſion in their Hides, / That their hot blood may ſpin in Engliſh eyes, / And doubt them with ſuperfluous courage : ha.
    • 1893, J. Keighley Snowden, “The Angel Barmaid”, in Tales of the Yorkshire Worlds, London: Sampson Low, Marston & Company, page 136:
      The fire she lit in every breast was fanned rather than douted by the rumour presently puffed abroad that she was the recipient of letters addressed in a man’s handwriting.
Related termsEdit
  • douter, a cone-shaped device with a handle for extinguishing a candle and stopping the smoke.

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German tōt, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Cognate with German tot, Dutch dood, English dead, Icelandic dauður.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dout (masculine douden, neuter dout, comparative méi dout, superlative am doutsten)

  1. dead

DeclensionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Related termsEdit