See also: Durian and durián

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Durian fruits

EtymologyEdit

From Malay durian, ultimately from Proto-Austronesian *duʀi (thorn). Doublet of iwi, from Māori.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈdʊə.ɹɪən/, /ˈdʒʊə.ɹɪən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈdʊə.ɹi.ən/, /ˈdʊə.ɹiˌɑn/

NounEdit

durian (countable and uncountable, plural durians)

  1. Any of several trees, genus Durio, of Southeast Asia.
  2. The spiky edible fruit of this tree, known for its strong taste and very strong, unpleasant odor.
    • 1692, Robert Boyle, General Heads for the Natural History of a Country Great or Small, London: John Taylor and S. Hedford, “Enquiries for Suratte, &c.,” p. 96,[1]
      Whether the Betele hath such a contrariety to the Durion, that a few Leaves of that, put to a whole Shopful of Durions, will make them all rot suddenly; and whether those that have surfeited on Durions, and thereby over-heated themselves, do, by laying a Leaf or two of Betele upon their Breasts or Stomachs, immediately cure the Inflammations, and Recover.
    • 1869 November, “The Land of the Malay: A Record of Travel in the Oriental Tropics”, in [Thomas] Mayne Reid, editor, Onward: A Magazine for the Young Manhood of America, New York, N.Y.: Onward Publishing Office, OCLC 8717398, page 494:
      The dessert I thoroughly enjoyed, for the various fruits of Singapore are delicious. One of them, the "durion," exhales a most noxious perfume, but is pleasant to the palate.
    • 1956, Anthony Burgess, Time for a Tiger (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 115:
      Old women crouched over bags of Siamese rice, skeps of red and green peppers, purple egg-plants, bristly rambutans, pineapples, durians.
  3. (uncountable) A yellow colour, like that of durian flesh (also called durian yellow).
    durian:  

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Bikol CentralEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Austronesian *duʀi (thorn).

NounEdit

durian

  1. durian (fruit)

Brunei MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

From duri (thorn) +‎ -an, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /durian/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: du‧ri‧an

NounEdit

durian

  1. durian (fruit)

CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

EtymologyEdit

From English durian, from Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

durian m (plural durians)

  1. durian

CebuanoEdit

NounEdit

durian

  1. nonstandard spelling of duryan

CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

From English durian, from Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

NounEdit

durian m

  1. durian

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

EtymologyEdit

From English durian, from Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

NounEdit

durian n

  1. durian

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From English durian, from Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

durian m (plural durians)

  1. durian

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an and duri +‎ -an.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

durian (first-person possessive durianku, second-person possessive durianmu, third-person possessive duriannya)

  1. durian

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From English durian, from Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

NounEdit

durian m

  1. durian

AnagramsEdit


KapampanganEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

NounEdit

durian

  1. durian

MalayEdit

 
Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms

EtymologyEdit

duri +‎ -an, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

durian (Jawi spelling دورينor دوريان‎, plural durian-durian, informal 1st possessive durianku, 2nd possessive durianmu, 3rd possessive duriannya)

  1. durian (fruit)

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From English durian, from Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

NounEdit

durian m

  1. durian (fruit)

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English durian, from Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

durian m inan

  1. durian
    Synonym: zybuczkowiec

Further readingEdit

  • durian in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • durian in Polish dictionaries at PWN

SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From English durian, from Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

NounEdit

durian c

  1. durian

DeclensionEdit

Declension of durian 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative durian durianen durianer durianerna
Genitive durians durianens durianers durianernas

TagalogEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: dur‧ian
  • IPA(key): /duɾˈjan/, [dʊɾˈjan]

NounEdit

durián

  1. alternative spelling of duryan

TurkishEdit

 
Turkish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia tr

EtymologyEdit

From English durian, from Malay durian, from Proto-Malayic *duri-an, from (Western) Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *duʀi-an.

NounEdit

durian

  1. durian

West MakianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay durian.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

durian

  1. durian fruit
  2. the durian tree

ReferencesEdit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[2], Pacific linguistics