estival

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French estival, from Latin aestivalis.

AdjectiveEdit

estival (comparative more estival, superlative most estival)

  1. Of or relating to summer.
    • 1938, James Agee, Knoxville: Summer of 1915:
      A horse, drawing a buggy, breaking his hollow iron music on the asphalt; a loud auto, a quiet auto; people in pairs, not in a hurry, scuffling, switching their weight of aestival body, talking casually; the taste hovering over them of vanilla, strawberry, pasteboard, and starched milk; the image upon them of lovers and horsemen, squared with clowns in hueless amber.
    Synonyms: summery, summer
    Antonyms: hibernal, brumal, winter, wintry
  2. Coming forth in the summer.
    • 1824, Thomas Forster, The Perennial Calendar, and Companion to the Almanack, page 328:
      [] begin now to redden in abundance on the trees, and continue throughout the month, and part of the next; more particulars of which will be found in our catalogue of aestival fruits. The birds now begin to be very active in devouring the fruits, ...
    • 1880, Rugby School. Natural History Society, Report of the Rugby School Natural History Society, page 5:
      To the first or aestival class must also be referred a small number of early spring flowerers, such as the Alyssums and Drabas.
    • 1892, Contribution[s] from the Botanical Survey of Nebraska, page 72:
      Thalictrum purpurascens. Lactuca pulchella. Verbena stricta. The estival period begins about the tenth of June, and is characterized by the rapid diminution of the vernal bloomers rather than by the addition of the important estival flowers .
    • 1911, John Merle Coulter, Henry Chandler Cowles, Ecology, page 843:
      On the other hand, many tropical flowers and a large number of estival flowers of temperate climates have more specialized structures, their nectar supply being hidden in spurs or at the base of long corolla tubes.
    • 2009, William Penn, Love in the Time of Flowers, Trafford Publishing (→ISBN), page 754:
      [] were basking near men-of-the-earth (always a morning glory) and kiss-mes and kiss-me-quicks where she was sure to contract spring fever, vulnerable as she with her romanticist heart was to get it now that estival flowers []

Coordinate termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aestivalis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

estival (masculine and feminine plural estivals)

  1. estival

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

[1119] From Old French estival, from Latin aestivālis, from aestas (summer).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛs.ti.val/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

estival (feminine singular estivale, masculine plural estivaux, feminine plural estivales)

  1. estival, summery

AntonymsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aestivālis (relating to the summer), from aestīvus (of the summer), from aestas (summer).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ɛsˈt̪ival]
  • Hyphenation: ès‧ti‧val

AdjectiveEdit

estival

  1. estival

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aestivālis (relating to the summer), from aestīvus (of the summer), from aestas (summer).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

estival (plural estivais, comparable)

  1. estival
  2. summery

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French estival.

AdjectiveEdit

estival m or n (feminine singular estivală, masculine plural estivali, feminine and neuter plural estivale)

  1. estival

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aestivālis (relating to the summer), from aestīvus (of the summer), from aestus (heat).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /estiˈbal/, [es.t̪iˈβ̞al]

AdjectiveEdit

estival (plural estivales)

  1. summery, estival
    Synonym: veraniego

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit