See also: Winter

Contents

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English winter, from Old English winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz ‎(winter). Cognate with West Frisian winter ‎(winter), Dutch winter ‎(winter), German Winter ‎(winter), Danish vinter ‎(winter), Swedish vinter ‎(winter), Icelandic vetur ‎(winter).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

winter ‎(countable and uncountable, plural winters)

Winter in Austria
  1. Traditionally the fourth of the four seasons, typically regarded as being from December 23 to March 20 in continental regions of the Northern Hemisphere or the months of June, July and August in the Southern Hemisphere. It is the time when the sun is lowest in the sky, resulting in short days, and the time of year with the lowest atmospheric temperatures for the region.
    • a1420, The British Museum Additional MS, 12,056, “Wounds complicated by the Dislocation of a Bone”, in Robert von Fleischhacker, editor, Lanfranc's "Science of cirurgie."[1], London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co, translation of original by Lanfranc of Milan, published 1894, ISBN 1163911380, page 63:
      Ne take noon hede to brynge togidere þe parties of þe boon þat is to-broken or dislocate, til viij. daies ben goon in þe wyntir, & v. in þe somer; for þanne it schal make quytture, and be sikir from swellynge; & þanne brynge togidere þe brynkis eiþer þe disiuncture after þe techynge þat schal be seid in þe chapitle of algebra.
    • 1592, Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1:
      And after summer evermore succeeds / Barren winter, with his wrathful nipping cold.
    • 1785, William Cowper, “Tirocinium: or, A Review of Schools." in The Poems of William Cowper, Vol. II., The Press of C. Whittingham (1822), page 174:
      There shall he learn, ere sixteen winters old, / That [...]
    • 1897, William Morris, The Water of the Wondrous Isles, Vol. I, Longmans, Green and Co. (1914), page 2:
      [...] a woman, tall, and strong of aspect, of some thirty winters by seeming, [...]
  2. (figuratively) The period of decay, old age, death, or the like.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Wordsworth, (Please provide the title of the work):
      Life's autumn past, I stand on winter's verge.

Usage notesEdit

  • Note that season names are usually spelled in all lowercase letters in English. This is contrast to the days of the week and months of the year, which are always spelled with a capitalized first letter, for example Thursday or September.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Seasons in English · seasons (layout · text)
spring summer fall, autumn winter

VerbEdit

winter ‎(third-person singular simple present winters, present participle wintering, simple past and past participle wintered)

  1. (intransitive) To spend the winter (in a particular place).
    When they retired, they hoped to winter in Florida.
  2. (transitive) To store something (for instance animals) somewhere over winter to protect it from cold.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

Most common English words before 1923: fortune · glass · silver · #961: winter · expect · nation · legal

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch winter.

NounEdit

winter ‎(plural winters)

  1. winter

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch winter, from Old Dutch *wintar, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz. Compare West Frisian and English winter, German Winter, Danish vinter.

NounEdit

winter m ‎(plural winters, diminutive wintertje n)

  1. winter

See alsoEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *wintruz, whence also Old Frisian winter, Old Saxon and Old High German wintar, Old Norse vetr and vintr, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐌽𐍄𐍂𐌿𐍃 ‎(wintrus). Perhaps represents a nasalised variant of Proto-Indo-European *wed- (whence also English water, wet); but perhaps akin to Old English winistre ‎(left (side)), with original sense possibly a cardinal direction or possibly "unfavorable" [2].

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

winter m

  1. winter (season)

DescendantsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz.

NounEdit

winter ‎(plural winters)

  1. winter

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian winter, from Proto-Germanic *wintruz. Compare Dutch and English winter, German Winter, Danish vinter.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

winter c ‎(plural winters)

  1. winter
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