See also: fönn

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fǫnn; cognate with Icelandic fönn, Danish fon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fonn f (genitive singular fannar, plural fannir)

  1. snowdrift
  2. bow wash, bow wave

DeclensionEdit

f4 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fonn fonnin fannir fannirnar
Accusative fonn fonnina fannir fannirnar
Dative fonn fonnini fonnum fonnunum
Genitive fannar fannarinnar fanna fannanna


SynonymsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish fonn (desire, fondness).

NounEdit

fonn m (genitive singular foinn)

  1. desire, urge
  2. mood (with chun or the genitive of what the person is in the mood for)
    fonn orm chun damhsa.
    I feel like dancing; I’m in the mood for dancing.
    fonn damhsa orm.
    I feel like dancing; I’m in the mood for dancing.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (West Cork) IPA(key): /fˠəun̪ˠ/

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish fonn (melody, song).

NounEdit

fonn m (genitive singular foinn, nominative plural foinn)

  1. (music) air (song)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fonn fhonn bhfonn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ M. L. Sjoestedt-Jonval (1938), Description d’un parler irlandais de Kerry, Paris: Librairie Ancienne Honoré Champion, p. 175.
  2. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899), Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 117.
  3. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906), A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 86.

Middle IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

fonn m

  1. desire, fondness, pleasure (in something)
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps an extension of fonn2.

NounEdit

fonn m

  1. melody, song
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fǫnn.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fonn f (definite singular fonna, indefinite plural fenner or fonner, definite plural fennene or fonnene)

  1. a snowdrift
  2. an avalanche
  3. a glacier

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly a late or variant form of bonn (sole, foot).

NounEdit

fonn m or n

  1. sole (of the foot):
  2. base, bottom, foundation
  3. soil, ground, (by extension) piece of land, territory

InflectionEdit

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative fonn fonnL fuinnL
Vocative fuinn fonnL fonnuH
Accusative fonnN fonnL fonnuH
Genitive fuinnL fonn fonnN
Dative fonnL fonnaib fonnaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Neuter o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative fonnN fonnN fonnL, fonna
Vocative fonnN fonnN fonnL, fonna
Accusative fonnN fonnN fonnL, fonna
Genitive fuinnL fonn fonnN
Dative fonnL fonnaib fonnaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
fonn ḟonn fonn
pronounced with /v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fonn m (genitive singular fuinn, plural fuinn)

  1. tune, melody

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
fonn fhonn
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

VilamovianEdit

NounEdit

fonn n (plural of fōn)

  1. flags