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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fonne (noun). More at fun.

NounEdit

fon (plural fons)

  1. (obsolete) A fool or idiot.
Derived termsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

 
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NounEdit

fon (plural fons)

  1. A chieftain or king of a region of Cameroon.
    • 2008, Milton Krieger, Cameroon's Social Democratic Front →ISBN, page 71:
      Province-wide, the latter part of the 1990s witnessed considerable efforts by the regime to organize and activate a bloc of such financially dependent fons in the North West Elite Association (NWELA), []
    • 2010, Historical Dictionary of the Republic of Cameroon →ISBN, page 53:
      In the early 1900s, the Bafut fought several wars with the German colonizers and their allies, ending in 1907 with the exile of the fon of that time.
    • 2011, Society and Change in Bali Nyonga: Critical Perspectives →ISBN, page 152:
      Biya's volte-face became apparent in July 1990 when he, as president of the ruling Cameroon People's Democratic Movement (CPDM) appointed Ganyonga and the fons of Mankon and Bafut into key positions of the party []
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

fon

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of fondre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of fondre

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

fon m (uncountable)

  1. Fon (language)

Further readingEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

fōn

  1. Romanization of 𐍆𐍉𐌽

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French fond (bottom)

NounEdit

fon

  1. bottom

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Uralic *puna- (to spin, twist). Cognates include Southern Mansi po̰n- and Finnish punoa.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fon

  1. (transitive) to spin (to make thread by twisting fibers)
    Gyapjút fontak. - They were spinning wool.
  2. (transitive) to weave
    kosarat fon - to weave baskets
  3. (transitive) to weave something (into something -ba/-be)
    Gyöngyöket font a hajába. - She wove pearls in her hair.
  4. (transitive) to braid, plait (to interweave three or more strands, strips)
    A haját copfba fonta. - She plaited her hair.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

(Expressions):

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Entry #812 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
  2. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch foon (phone), from Ancient Greek φωνή (phōnḗ, sound).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɔn]
  • Hyphenation: fon

NounEdit

fon (plural fon-fon, first-person possessive fonku, second-person possessive fonmu, third-person possessive fonnya)

  1. (linguistics) phone, a speech segment that possesses distinct physical or perceptual properties, considered as a physical event without regard to its place in the phonology of a language.

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch föhn (foehn), from German Föhn, from Vulgar Latin *faōnius, from Latin Favōnius (Favonius), a Roman wind god.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɔn]
  • Hyphenation: fon

NounEdit

fon (plural fon-fon, first-person possessive fonku, second-person possessive fonmu, third-person possessive fonnya)

  1. (meteorology) foehn, a warm dry wind blowing down the north sides of the Alps, especially in Switzerland, and similar warm dry wind developing on the lee side of a mountain.

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From English font, from Middle French fonte, feminine past participle of verb fondre (to melt).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɔn]
  • Hyphenation: fon

NounEdit

fon (plural fon-fon, first-person possessive fonku, second-person possessive fonmu, third-person possessive fonnya)

  1. (computing, typography) font.

Alternative formsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally a brandname, from German Fön, from Föhn, a warm, dry wind.

NounEdit

fon m (invariable)

  1. hairdryer, blowdryer
    Synonym: asciugacapelli

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown.

VerbEdit

fon

  1. Alternative form of fonnen

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown.

NounEdit

fon

  1. Alternative form of fonne

AdjectiveEdit

fon

  1. Alternative form of fonne

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English ġefān, plural of ġefāh.

NounEdit

fon

  1. plural of fo

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier *fōhan [ˈfoː.hɑn], from Proto-Germanic *fanhaną. Cognate with Old Frisian , Old Saxon fahan, Old Dutch fān, Old High German fahan, Old Norse , Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌷𐌰𐌽 (fahan).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fōn

  1. to catch, capture; seize
  2. (with tō) to take what is given, receive or accept what is offered
  3. (with tō) to conquer, take over
    Hīe cwǣdon þæt hē wolde þǣre byriġ fōn.
    They said he would take over the city.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: fon, fangen

Old High GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *afanē, *fanē, *funē (from).

PrepositionEdit

fon

  1. from

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

PrepositionEdit

fon

  1. Alternative form of fan

Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *afana. Compare West Frisian fan, German von.

PrepositionEdit

fon

  1. from
  2. of

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

fo + an

PrepositionEdit

fon

  1. under the
  2. under their

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek φωνή (phōnḗ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fȏn m (Cyrillic spelling фо̑н)

  1. (linguistics) phone
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French fond.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fȏn m (Cyrillic spelling фо̑н)

  1. basis, foundation
  2. (painting) the first layer that lays the foundation for the painting
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

VilamovianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German von (from), from Old High German fon, fona (from). Cognate with German von.

PrepositionEdit

fon

  1. from
  2. of (belonging to)