TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

fon

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Fon.

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fonne (noun). More at fun.

NounEdit

fon (plural fons)

  1. (obsolete) A fool or idiot.
    • c. 1503–1512, John Skelton, Ware the Hauke; republished in John Scattergood, editor, John Skelton: The Complete English Poems, 1983, OCLC 8728872, lines 128–129, page 65:
      Delt he not lyke a fon?
      Delt he not lyke a daw?
Derived termsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

NounEdit

fon (plural fons)

  1. A chieftain or king of a region of Cameroon.
    • 2008, Milton Krieger, Cameroon's Social Democratic Front, →ISBN, page 71:
      Province-wide, the latter part of the 1990s witnessed considerable efforts by the regime to organize and activate a bloc of such financially dependent fons in the North West Elite Association (NWELA), []
    • 2010, Historical Dictionary of the Republic of Cameroon, →ISBN, page 53:
      In the early 1900s, the Bafut fought several wars with the German colonizers and their allies, ending in 1907 with the exile of the fon of that time.
    • 2011, Society and Change in Bali Nyonga: Critical Perspectives, →ISBN, page 152:
      Biya's volte-face became apparent in July 1990 when he, as president of the ruling Cameroon People's Democratic Movement (CPDM) appointed Ganyonga and the fons of Mankon and Bafut into key positions of the party []
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek φωνή (phōnḗ, sound).

NounEdit

fon m (plural fons)

  1. (lingustics) phone
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

fon

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of fondre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of fondre

CornishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Late Cornish) IPA(key): /foːn/
  • (Middle Cornish) IPA(key): /fɔːn/

NounEdit

fon m (plural fons)

  1. telephone, phone

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fɔ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

fon m (uncountable)

  1. Fon (language)

Further readingEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

fōn

  1. Romanization of 𐍆𐍉𐌽

Haitian CreoleEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French fond (bottom).

NounEdit

fon

  1. bottom

Etymology 2Edit

From French front (forehead).

NounEdit

fon

  1. forehead

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Ugric *pŭna-, from Proto-Uralic *puna-. Cognates include Southern Mansi po̰n- and Finnish punoa.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fon

  1. (transitive) to spin (to make thread by twisting fibers)
    Gyapjút fontak.They were spinning (or they spun) wool.
  2. (transitive) to weave
    kosarat fonto weave baskets
  3. (transitive) to weave something (into something -ba/-be)
    Gyöngyöket font a hajába.She wove pearls in her hair.
  4. (transitive) to braid, plait (to interweave three or more strands, strips)
    A haját copfba fonta.She plaited her hair. (literally, “She wove her hair into a plait.”)

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

Expressions

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Entry #812 in Uralonet, online Uralic etymological database of the Research Institute for Linguistics, Hungary.
  2. ^ fon in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further readingEdit

  • fon in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch foon (phone), from Ancient Greek φωνή (phōnḗ, sound).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɔn]
  • Hyphenation: fon

NounEdit

fon (first-person possessive fonku, second-person possessive fonmu, third-person possessive fonnya)

  1. (linguistics) phone, a speech segment that possesses distinct physical or perceptual properties, considered as a physical event without regard to its place in the phonology of a language.

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch föhn (foehn), from German Föhn, from Vulgar Latin *faōnius, from Latin Favōnius (Favonius), a Roman wind god.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɔn]
  • Hyphenation: fon

NounEdit

fon (first-person possessive fonku, second-person possessive fonmu, third-person possessive fonnya)

  1. (meteorology) foehn, a warm dry wind blowing down the north sides of the Alps, especially in Switzerland, and similar warm dry wind developing on the lee side of a mountain.
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From English font, from Middle French fonte, feminine past participle of verb fondre (to melt).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfɔn]
  • Hyphenation: fon

NounEdit

fon (first-person possessive fonku, second-person possessive fonmu, third-person possessive fonnya)

  1. (computing, typography) font.
Alternative formsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally a brandname, from German Fön, from Föhn, a warm, dry wind.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fon m (invariable)

  1. hairdryer, blowdryer
    Synonym: asciugacapelli

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown.

VerbEdit

fon

  1. Alternative form of fonnen

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown.

NounEdit

fon

  1. Alternative form of fonne

AdjectiveEdit

fon

  1. Alternative form of fonne

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English ġefān, plural of ġefāh; equivalent to fo +‎ -en (plural suffix).

NounEdit

fon

  1. plural of fo

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier *fōhan [ˈfoː.xɑn], from Proto-West Germanic *fą̄han. Cognate with Old Frisian , Old Saxon fahan, Old Dutch fān, Old High German fahan, Old Norse , Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌷𐌰𐌽 (fahan).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fōn

  1. to catch, capture; seize
  2. (with tō) to take what is given, receive or accept what is offered
  3. (with tō) to conquer, take over
    Hīe cwǣdon þæt hē wolde þǣre byrġ fōn.
    They said he would take over the city.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: fon, fangen

Old FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *fanē (from), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂pó. Cognates include Old Saxon fan and Old Dutch fan.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

fon

  1. of

DescendantsEdit

  • North Frisian: foon
  • Saterland Frisian: fon
  • West Frisian: fan

ReferencesEdit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Old High GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *afanē, *fanē, *funē (from).

PrepositionEdit

fon

  1. from

DescendantsEdit


Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

fon

  1. Univerbation of fo (under) +‎ in (the (accusative singular masculine/feminine; dative singular all genders))
    • c. 850-875, Turin Glosses and Scholia on St. Mark, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 484–94, Tur. 110c
      Ba bés leusom do·bertis dá boc leu dochum tempuil, ⁊ no·léicthe indala n‑aí fon díthrub co pecad in popuil, ⁊ do·bertis maldachta foir, ⁊ n⟨o⟩·oircthe didiu and ó popul tar cenn a pecthae ind aile.
      It was a custom with them that two he-goats were brought by them to the temple, and one of the two of them was let go to the wilderness with the sin of the people, and curses were put upon him, and thereupon the other was slain there by the people for their sins.

Old SaxonEdit

PrepositionEdit

fon

  1. Alternative form of fan

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

Internationalism; compare English phon, French phone, German Phon, ultimately from Ancient Greek φωνή (phōnḗ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fon m inan

  1. (acoustics) phon (logarithmic unit of loudness level for tones and complex sounds)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • fon in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • fon in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French phone.

NounEdit

fon m (plural foni)

  1. phon

DeclensionEdit


Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian fon, from Proto-West Germanic [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *fanē. Cognates include West Frisian fan and German von.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

fon (neuter or distal adverb deerfon, proximal adverb hierfon, interrogative adverb wierfon)

  1. of
    • 2000, Marron C. Fort, transl., Dät Näie Tästamänt un do Psoolme in ju aasterlauwerfräiske Uurtoal fon dät Seelterlound, Fräislound, Butjoarlound, Aastfräislound un do Groninger Umelounde [The New Testament and the Psalms in the East Frisian language, native to Saterland, Friesland, Butjadingen, East Frisia and the Ommelanden of Groningen], →ISBN, Dät Evangelium ätter Matthäus 1:20:
      Wilst hie noch deeruur ättertoachte, ferskeen him n Ängel fon dän Here in n Droom un kwaad: Josef, Súun fon David, freze die nit, Maria as dien Wieuw bie die aptouníemen;
      While he was still thinking about it, came to him an angel from the Lord in a dream and said: Joseph, son of David, don't be afraid to take Maria as your wife;
  2. from
    • 2000, Marron C. Fort, transl., Dät Näie Tästamänt un do Psoolme in ju aasterlauwerfräiske Uurtoal fon dät Seelterlound, Fräislound, Butjoarlound, Aastfräislound un do Groninger Umelounde [The New Testament and the Psalms in the East Frisian language, native to Saterland, Friesland, Butjadingen, East Frisia and the Ommelanden of Groningen], →ISBN, Dät Evangelium ätter Matthäus 1:21:
      Ju skäl n Súun bere; him skääst du dän Nome Jesus reke; dan hie skäl sien Foulk fon sien Sänden ferleze.
      She will bear a son; you shall give him the name Jesus; then he shall set his people free from its sins.

ReferencesEdit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “fon”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fɔn̪ˠ/
  • Hyphenation: fon

PrepositionEdit

fon (+ dative)

  1. Contraction of fo an.

Usage notesEdit

  • Like the bare article an, fon triggers lenition if the following noun begins with f, c and g.

ReferencesEdit

  • Colin Mark (2003), “fo”, in The Gaelic-English dictionary, London: Routledge, →ISBN, page 307

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek φωνή (phōnḗ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fȏn m (Cyrillic spelling фо̑н)

  1. (linguistics) phone
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French fond.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fȏn m (Cyrillic spelling фо̑н)

  1. basis, foundation
  2. (painting) the first layer that lays the foundation for the painting
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Sranan TongoEdit

VerbEdit

fon

  1. to beat, to thrash, to pummel
  2. to mash, to puree

VilamovianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German von (from), from Old High German fon, fona (from). Cognate with German von.

PrepositionEdit

fon

  1. from
  2. of (belonging to)