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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

French fritte, from frit (fried).

NounEdit

frit (plural frits)

  1. A fused mixture of materials used to make glass
  2. (archaeology) Similar methods used in the manufacture of ceramic beads and small ornaments. (eastern Mediterranean; bronze and iron age)

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

frit (third-person singular simple present frits, present participle fritting, simple past and past participle fritted)

  1. To add frit to a glass or ceramic mixture
  2. To prepare by heat (the materials for making glass); to fuse partially.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ure to this entry?)

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Dialectal form of past participle of to fright.

AdjectiveEdit

frit (comparative more frit, superlative most frit)

  1. (Britain, regional) Frightened.
    • 1983 Margaret Thatcher, Prime minister's questions, 19 April:
      The right hon. Gentleman is afraid of an election, is he? Afraid? Frightened? Frit? Could not take it? Cannot stand it? If I were going to cut and run, I should have gone after the Falklands.
    • 2016, Alan Moore, Jerusalem, Liveright 2016, p. 272:
      “We shoulder life. We know its ins and outs. We've felt the draught at either end of it. What you're most frit of, that's our bread and jam, and none of us ain't got no time to spare on ignorant, bad-mannered little boys.”

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

frit

  1. neuter singular of fri

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Latin frīctus.

VerbEdit

frit m (feminine singular frite, masculine plural frits, feminine plural frites)

  1. past participle of frire

AdjectiveEdit

frit (feminine singular frite, masculine plural frits, feminine plural frites)

  1. fried

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain origin;[1] proposed derivations include:

Proper nounEdit

frit n (indeclinable)

  1. awn

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Walde, Alois; Hofmann, Johann Baptist (1938), “frit”, in Lateinisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 1, 3rd edition, Heidelberg: Carl Winter, page 550

NormanEdit

 
Norman Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nrm

EtymologyEdit

From Old French fruit, from Latin fructus.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

frit m (plural frits)

  1. (Jersey, France) fruit

Derived termsEdit


Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

frit

  1. second-person singular of fri