See also: Bite, bitē, bitė, and bǐtè

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English biten, from Old English bītan (to bite), from Proto-West Germanic *bītan, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną (to bite), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split). Cognates include Saterland Frisian biete (to bite), West Frisian bite (to bite), Dutch bijten (to bite), German Low German bieten (to bite), German beißen (to bite), Danish bide (to bite), Swedish bita (to bite), Norwegian Bokmål bite (to bite), Norwegian Nynorsk bita (to bite), Icelandic bíta (to bite), Gothic 𐌱𐌴𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌽 (beitan, to bite), Latin findō (split, verb), Ancient Greek φείδομαι (pheídomai), Sanskrit भिद् (bhid, to break).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bite (third-person singular simple present bites, present participle biting, simple past bit, past participle bitten or (rare) bit)

  1. (transitive) To cut into something by clamping the teeth.
    As soon as you bite that sandwich, you'll know how good it is.
  2. (transitive) To hold something by clamping one's teeth.
  3. (intransitive) To attack with the teeth.
    That dog is about to bite!
  4. (intransitive) To behave aggressively; to reject advances.
    If you see me, come and say hello. I don't bite.
  5. (intransitive) To take hold; to establish firm contact with.
    I needed snow chains to make the tires bite.
  6. (intransitive) To have significant effect, often negative.
    For homeowners with adjustable rate mortgages, rising interest will really bite.
  7. (intransitive, of a fish) To bite a baited hook or other lure and thus be caught.
    Are the fish biting today?
  8. (intransitive, figuratively) To accept something offered, often secretly or deceptively, to cause some action by the acceptor.
    I've planted the story. Do you think they'll bite?
  9. (intransitive, transitive, of an insect) To sting.
    These mosquitoes are really biting today!
  10. (intransitive) To cause a smarting sensation; to have a property which causes such a sensation; to be pungent.
    It bites like pepper or mustard.
  11. (transitive, sometimes figuratively) To cause sharp pain or damage to; to hurt or injure.
    Pepper bites the mouth.
  12. (intransitive) To cause sharp pain; to produce anguish; to hurt or injure; to have the property of so doing.
  13. (intransitive) To take or keep a firm hold.
    The anchor bites.
  14. (transitive) To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to.
    The anchor bites the ground.
  15. (intransitive, slang) To lack quality; to be worthy of derision; to suck.
    This music really bites.
  16. (transitive, informal, vulgar) To perform oral sex on. Used in invective.
    You don't like that I sat on your car? Bite me.
  17. (intransitive, African-American Vernacular, slang) To plagiarize, to imitate.
    He always be biting my moves.
  18. (obsolete) To deceive or defraud; to take in.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Terms related to bite (verb senses)

DescendantsEdit

  • Sranan Tongo: beti

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

bite (plural bites)

  1. The act of biting.
  2. The wound left behind after having been bitten.
    That snake bite really hurts!
  3. The swelling of one's skin caused by an insect's mouthparts or sting.
    After just one night in the jungle I was covered with mosquito bites.
  4. A piece of food of a size that would be produced by biting; a mouthful.
    There were only a few bites left on the plate.
  5. (slang) Something unpleasant.
    That's really a bite!
  6. (slang) An act of plagiarism.
    That song is a bite of my song!
  7. A small meal or snack.
    I'll have a quick bite to quiet my stomach until dinner.
  8. (figuratively) aggression
    • 2011 March 2, Saj Chowdhury, “Man City 3 - 0 Aston Villa”, in BBC[1]:
      City scored the goals but periods of ball possession were shared - the difference being Villa lacked bite in the opposition final third.
  9. The hold which the short end of a lever has upon the thing to be lifted, or the hold which one part of a machine has upon another.
  10. (colloquial, dated) A cheat; a trick; a fraud.
    • 1725, Thomas Gordon, The Humorist
      The baser methods of getting money by fraud and bite, by deceiving and overreaching.
  11. (colloquial, dated, slang) A sharper; one who cheats.
    • 1751, [Tobias] Smollett, “Pickle Seems Tolerably Well Reconciled to His Cage; [] ”, in The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle [], volume IV, London: Harrison and Co., [], published 1781, OCLC 316121541, page 385, column 1:
      [I]t was conjectured, that Peregrine was a bite from the beginning, who had found credit on account of his effrontery and appearance, and impoſed himſelf upon the town as a young gentleman of fortune.
  12. (printing) A blank on the edge or corner of a page, owing to a portion of the frisket, or something else, intervening between the type and paper.
  13. (slang) A cut, a proportion of profits; an amount of money.
    • 1951, William S. Burroughs, in Harris (ed.), Letters 1945–59, Penguin 2009, p. 92:
      I know three Americans who are running a bar. The cops come in all the time for a bite.

SynonymsEdit

  • (act of biting):
  • (wound left behind after having been bitten):
  • (swelling caused by an insect's mouthparts or sting): sting
  • (piece of food of a size that would be produced by biting): mouthful
  • (slang: something unpleasant):
  • (slang: act of plagiarism):
  • (small meal or snack): snack
  • (figuratively: aggression):

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from bite (noun senses)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bite f (plural bites)

  1. (slang, vulgar) knob, cock, dick
    Il a souri quand j'ai mis la main entre ses cuisses et je me suis mise à frotter sa grosse bite.
    He smiled when I put my hand between his thighs and started to rub his big cock.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GaroEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

bite

  1. fruit

Khumi ChinEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bite

  1. hot

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[2], Payap University, page 74

LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *bitē (compare Lithuanian bitė), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰey-, *bʰī-. Cognate to English bee.

NounEdit

bite f (5th declension)

  1. bee

DeclensionEdit


Murui HuitotoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Huitoto-Ocaina *bíʔte.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbi.tɛ]
  • Hyphenation: bi‧te

VerbEdit

bite

  1. (intransitive) to come

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Shirley Burtch (1983) Diccionario Huitoto Murui (Tomo I) (Linguistica Peruana No. 20)‎[3] (in Spanish), Yarinacocha, Peru: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, page 36
  • Katarzyna Izabela Wojtylak (2017) A grammar of Murui (Bue): a Witotoan language of Northwest Amazonia.[4], Townsville: James Cook University press (PhD thesis), page 76

NeapolitanEdit

NounEdit

bite

  1. plural of bita

North FrisianEdit

VerbEdit

bite

  1. (Halligen), (Mooring) to bite

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bíta, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split).

VerbEdit

bite (present tense biter, past tense bet or beit, past participle bitt, present participle bitende)

  1. to bite

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse bíta, from Proto-Germanic *bītaną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to split). Akin to English bite.

VerbEdit

bite (present tense bit, past tense beit, supine bite, past participle biten, present participle bitande, imperative bit)

  1. to bite

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *biti.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bite m

  1. bite

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʲi.tɛ/
  • Hyphenation: bi‧te
  • Rhymes: -itɛ

ParticipleEdit

bite

  1. inflection of bity:
    1. neuter nominative/accusative/vocative singular
    2. nonvirile nominative/accusative/vocative plural

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

bite

  1. dative singular of bit

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian bīta

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bite

  1. to bite

InflectionEdit

Strong class 1
infinitive bite
3rd singular past biet
past participle biten
infinitive bite
long infinitive biten
gerund biten n
indicative present tense past tense
1st singular byt biet
2nd singular bytst bietst
3rd singular byt biet
plural bite bieten
imperative byt
participles bitend biten

Further readingEdit

  • bite (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011