Open main menu
See also: Lit, lít, līt, lit., &lit, -lit, and Lit.

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɪt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lihte, from Old English līhtte, first and third person singular preterit of līhtan (to light). More at light.

VerbEdit

lit

  1. simple past tense and past participle of light (illuminate; start a fire; etc)
  2. simple past tense and past participle of light (alight: land, come down on)
    • 1896, Florence Merriam Bailey, A-birding on a Bronco, page 87:
      [] but finally [the bird] came to the tree and, after edging along falteringly, lit on a branch above them.

lit (third-person singular simple present lits, present participle litting, simple past and past participle litted)

  1. (US, dialectal) To run or light (alight).
    • 1988, April 8, “Grant Pick”, in Johnny Washington's Life[1]:
      With that the kid lits off down the street, and, what do you know!

AdjectiveEdit

lit (comparative more lit, superlative most lit)

  1. Illuminated.
    He walked down the lit corridor.
  2. (slang) intoxicated or under the influence of drugs; stoned.
  3. (slang) Sexually aroused (usually of a female), especially visibly sexually aroused.
  4. (slang) Excellent, fantastic; captivating.
    We ordered pizza and we're going to stay up all night. It's going to be lit.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English lit, lut, from Old English lȳt (little, few), from Proto-Germanic *lūtilaz (little, small), from Proto-Indo-European *lewd- (to cower, hunch over). Cognate with Old Saxon lut (little), Middle High German lützen (to make small or low, decrease). More at little.

AdjectiveEdit

lit (comparative litter or more lit, superlative littest or most lit)

  1. (obsolete) Little.

NounEdit

lit (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Little.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English lit, from Old Norse litr (colour, dye, complexion, face, countenance), from Proto-Germanic *wlitiz, *wlitaz (sight, face), from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (to see). Cognate with Icelandic litur (colour), Old English wlite (brightness, appearance, form, aspect, look, countenance, beauty, splendor, adornment), Old English wlītan (to gaze, look, observe).

NounEdit

lit (uncountable)

  1. (Britain dialectal) Colour; blee; dye; stain.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English litten, liten, from Old Norse lita (to colour), from litr (colour). See above.

VerbEdit

lit (third-person singular simple present lits, present participle litting, simple past and past participle litted)

  1. (transitive) To colour; dye.

Etymology 5Edit

Short for literature.

NounEdit

lit (uncountable)

  1. Clipping of literature.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the verb líta (‘to view’)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lit n (genitive singular lits, uncountable)

  1. short wink, view, look

DeclensionEdit

Declension of lit (singular only)
n3s singular
indefinite definite
nominative lit litið
accusative lit litið
dative liti litinum
genitive lits litsins

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French lit, from Latin lectus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lit m (plural lits)

  1. bed
    Où est-il? Il dort dans son lit.
    Where is he? He's sleeping in his bed.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

lit

  1. third-person singular present indicative of lire
    Jean lit très souvent. - Jean reads very often.

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

LashiEdit

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

lit (plural *lits)

  1. Alternative form of light

ReferencesEdit


NormanEdit

NounEdit

lit m (plural lits)

  1. Alternative form of llit (bed)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hlít

NounEdit

lit f (definite singular lita, uncountable)
lit m (definite singular liten, uncountable)

  1. trust
    Eg set min lit til Gud.
    I put my trust in God.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

lit

  1. present tense of lita and lite
  2. imperative of lita and lite

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lectus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lit m (oblique plural liz or litz, nominative singular liz or litz, nominative plural lit)

  1. bed

DescendantsEdit


Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

lit n

  1. vision
  2. sight
  3. vision

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

Chemical element
Li Previous: hel (He)
Next: beryl (Be)

lit m inan

  1. lithium
  2. (informal) lithium carbonate, a drug used in the treatment of bipolar disorder
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

lit m anim

  1. litas (currency of Lithuania)
DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • lit in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

lit f

  1. genitive singular of lite

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

lit c

  1. trust

DeclensionEdit

Declension of lit 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative lit liten
Genitive lits litens

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Licht and English light.

NounEdit

lit (plural lits)

  1. light
  2. illumination

DeclensionEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

VerbEdit

lit (preterite litä or littä, supine litt or litti)

  1. (transitive) trust, obey, follow someone’s advice
    Lit meg; ji val int ångerköft
    Follow my advice, you will not regret the purchase.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

lit (preterite litä)

  1. (intransitive) be expensive, heavy; strain
    lit på tulumodä
    It tries the patience.

ZayEdit

NounEdit

lit

  1. tree-bark

ReferencesEdit

  • Initial SLLE Survey of the Zway Area by Klaus Wedekind and Charlotte Wedekind