See also: Gest

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Homophone: jest

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Middle French geste. Doublet of jest.

NounEdit

gest (countable and uncountable, plural gests)

  1. (obsolete) A gesture or action.
  2. (archaic) A story or adventure; a verse or prose romance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  3. (archaic) An action represented in sports, plays, or on the stage; show; ceremony.
    • a. 1639, Joseph Mede, a sermon
      And surely no Ceremonies of dedication , no not of Solomons Temple it self , are comparable to those sacred gests , whereby this place was sanctified
  4. (archaic) bearing; deportment
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Compare gist a resting place.

NounEdit

gest (plural gests)

  1. (obsolete) A stage in travelling; a stop for rest or lodging in a journey; a rest.
  2. (obsolete) A roll reciting the several stages arranged for a royal progress.
    • 1829, John Hanmer, "Proteus", Fra Cipolla: And Other Poems
      The pictured lives of martyr, or of saint,
      Or gests of valorous knight

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gestus, attested from the 14th century.[1]

NounEdit

gest m (plural gests or gestos)

  1. gesture

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “gest” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

gest

  1. indefinite accusative singular of gestur

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

gest

  1. singular present indicative of getast
  2. second-person imperative of getast

Middle DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *gest, *gist, from Proto-West Germanic *jestu.

NounEdit

gest m or f

  1. yeast

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: gist

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From a conflation of Old Norse gestr and Old English ġiest; both from Proto-Germanic *gastiz, from Proto-Germanic *gʰóstis. Doublet of host.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gest (plural gestes)

  1. A guest, visitor; somebody staying at another's residence.
  2. A customer of a hostel or inn; one that pays for accommodation.
  3. An unknown person; a foreigner or outsider.
  4. A (often threatening) male individual; a ominous person.
  5. (figuratively, rare) A male lover of a woman; a man in an unofficial intimate relationship with a woman.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

gest

  1. Alternative form of geste (tale)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

gest

  1. Alternative form of geste (tribe)

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

gest

  1. Alternative form of gesten (to host a guest)

Etymology 5Edit

VerbEdit

gest

  1. Alternative form of gesten (to read poetry)

Etymology 6Edit

NounEdit

gest

  1. Alternative form of yest (beer foam)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gestus, via French geste

NounEdit

gest m (definite singular gesten, indefinite plural gester, definite plural gestene)

  1. a gesture

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gestus, via French geste

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gest m (definite singular gesten, indefinite plural gestar, definite plural gestane)

  1. a gesture

ReferencesEdit


Old FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly borrowed from Old Saxon gēst or Old High German geist.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡeːst/, [ˈɡɛːst]

NounEdit

gēst m

  1. Alternative form of gāst

ReferencesEdit

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN, page 28

Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

gest

  1. accusative/dative singular of gestr

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *gaist.

NounEdit

gēst m

  1. A soul, spirit, breath

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin gestura, nominative singular of gesturus (about to carry).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛst/
  • (file)

NounEdit

gest m inan

  1. gesture

DeclensionEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French geste.

NounEdit

gest n (plural gesturi)

  1. gesture

SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gestus (having been carried)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gest c

  1. a gesture; a motion of the hands
    gäster med gester
    guests with gestures (title of a Swedish TV show)
  2. a gesture; a symbolic action, a signal

DeclensionEdit

Declension of gest 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative gest gesten gester gesterna
Genitive gests gestens gesters gesternas

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gest

  1. Soft mutation of cest.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cest gest nghest chest
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.