Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A substantivization of Low German güst (dry and infertile, adjective).

NounEdit

geest (plural geests)

  1. A type of slightly raised landscape, with sandy and gravelly soils, that occurs in the plains of Northern Germany, the Northern Netherlands and Denmark.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of R. Jameson to this entry?)

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɣeːst/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: geest
  • Rhymes: -eːst

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch gêest, from Old Dutch gēst, geist, from Proto-Germanic *gaistaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰeysd-, *ǵʰisd- (anger, agitation). Cognate with German Geist, West Frisian geast, English ghost, Swedish gast.

NounEdit

geest m (plural geesten, diminutive geestje n)

  1. ghost, spirit
  2. mind, mental conscience
  3. life force, vital energy
  4. (alchemy) spirit, gas, distillate, essence
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: gees

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Dutch geest, from Old Dutch *gēst, a nominalization of an adjective that meant “dry, infertile”, a derivation of Proto-Germanic *gais- (infertile).

Cognate to West Frisian gaast, geast (as in the Dutch/Frisian place name Gaasterland) and German Geest (which is borrowed from Low German). Other derivations of *gais- are: Old English gæsne (infertility, poverty), Old French gast (waste) and Icelandic gisinn (dry).[1][2]

NounEdit

geest m (plural geesten, diminutive geestje n)

  1. heath, heathland
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kluge, Friedrich (1989), “Geest”, in Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological dictionary of the German language] (in German), 22nd edition, →ISBN
  2. ^ J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

geest

  1. Alternative form of gesten (to read poetry)