EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
A sombrero-wearing mariachi singer in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.

Borrowed from Spanish hombre (man; human being), from Old Spanish omne, from Latin hominem, accusative of homō (a human being, a person), from Old Latin hemō, from Proto-Italic *hemō (man), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰmṓ (earthling), from *dʰéǵʰōm (earth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hombre (plural hombres)

  1. (chiefly US, in Spanish-speaking contexts, slang) A man, a chap, a guy; especially a Hispanic or Spanish man.
    He's one tough hombre.
    • c. 1850, [Thomas] Mayne Reid, “A Group of Jarochos”, in The Guerilla Chief, and Other Tales, London: C. H. Clarke, 13, Paternoster Row, OCLC 248586966, page 62:
      [W]e're glad to learn that the Yankee bullet has not quite stopped your breath. You're all right, hombre!
    • 1852 March 8, E. P., “Golden Correspondence.—No. 1”, in J[oseph] M. Church, editor, Church’s Bizarre. For Fireside and Wayside, volume I, number 1 (New Series), Philadelphia, Pa.: Church & Co., 140 Chestnut Street, published 17 April 1852, OCLC 667127446, page 9, column 2:
      That hombre now with the worn out hat, tattered shirt, and fragmentary breeches, wears a sword. Bless you, his dignity would suffer greatly without it!
    • 2010, Jon Sharpe [pseudonym], chapter 1, in Rocky Mountain Revenge (The Trailsman; no. 342), New York, N.Y.: Signet Books, New American Library, →ISBN:
      The foreman. As tough an hombre who ever lived. If Mr. Bell had sent Jackson instead of me, he'd take your rifle and beat you half to death with it.
    • 2016, Lawrence Winkler, “Bajada”, in Orion’s Cartwheel (Cartwheels Quadrilogy; 1), Victoria, B.C.: First Choice Books, →ISBN, page 22:
      There was a pause I didn't like, punctuated by shrieks of shrill laughter from the hombres at the bar. Only Mexicans can laugh like that.

Further readingEdit


AragoneseEdit

 
Aragonese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia an

EtymologyEdit

From Navarro-Aragonese hombre (man), from Latin homo, hominem (man).

NounEdit

hombre m

  1. (anthropology) man
  2. husband

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hombre m (plural hombres)

  1. A kind of card game from Spain.

Navarro-AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin homo, hominem (man).

NounEdit

hombre m

  1. man
    • SEGVNT QVE HAVE mos ſeydo en muytos liuros el primo hombŕ q̃ se poblo en España hauia nombre Tubaſ .del qual yxio la geuacon dlos ybers . [1]

DescendantsEdit

  • Aragonese: hombre, ombre

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Through dissimilation from Old Spanish omne, from Latin hominem, accusative of homō, from Old Latin hemō, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰmṓ (earthling). Same source as the form omo (which does not exhibit diphthongisation either). Compare Portuguese homem and Catalan home.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hombre m (plural hombres)

  1. man, (adult male human)
  2. man, (all humans collectively); mankind, humankind.
  3. (anthropology, archaeology, paleontology) man, (individual of the species Homo sapiens, the genus Homo, or the subtribe Hominina).
  4. (colloquial) husband.
  5. (gay slang) top
    Synonym: activo
  6. a 17th century card game also called ombre.

Derived termsEdit

(diminutive hombrecillo or hombrecito) (augmentative hombretón)

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

InterjectionEdit

¡hombre!

  1. Man!
  2. Hey!
  3. Oh, come on!