journal

See also: Journal

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman jurnal (daily), from Old French jornel (day) (French journal),[1] from Latin diurnālis, from diurnus (of the day), from diēs (day) (whence also diary), from *djous, from Proto-Indo-European *dyḗws (heaven, sky). Doublet of diurnal. The sound change from Latin to French (‘diur’ to ‘jor’) is due to the ‘i’ changing to a ‘j’, followed by the ‘d’ being dropped; compare French jour (day).[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

journal (plural journals)

  1. A diary or daily record of a person, organization, vessel etc.; daybook.
  2. A newspaper or magazine dealing with a particular subject.
    The university's biology department subscribes to half a dozen academic journals.
  3. (accounting) A chronological record of payments.
  4. (computing) A chronological record of changes made to a database or other system; along with a backup or image copy that allows recovery after a failure or reinstatement to a previous time; a log.
  5. (engineering) The part of a shaft or axle that rests on bearings.

Usage notesEdit

In the sense “daily record”, diary and journal are often used interchangeably. When usage is distinguished, diary refers more strictly to a personal daily record, while journal is used more loosely, for example for less frequent, thematic personal writing.[3]

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

journal (third-person singular simple present journals, present participle journaling or journalling, simple past and past participle journaled or journalled)

  1. To archive or record something.
  2. To scrapbook.
  3. To insert (a shaft, etc.) in a journal bearing.

AdjectiveEdit

journal (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Daily.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.xi:
      his faint steedes watred in Ocean deepe, / Whiles from their iournall labours they did rest [...].

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 journal” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  2. ^ Brachet, Auguste (1873) G.W. Kitchin, transl., An etymological dictionary of the French language, Oxford, page 206
  3. ^ “What’s the difference between “diary” and “journal”?”, in English Language & Usage[1], 2012-06-10

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Old French journal (daily), from Latin diurnālis, from diurnus (of the day), from diēs (day).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʒuʁ.nal/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

journal (feminine singular journale, masculine plural journaux, feminine plural journales)

  1. That is relative to each day; journal.

NounEdit

journal m (plural journaux)

  1. diary, journal
  2. newspaper
  3. periodical
  4. newsbreak
    Tu as regardé le journal ?(please add an English translation of this usage example)
  5. (computing) log

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin diurnālis, from diurnus (of the day), from diēs (day).

AdjectiveEdit

journal m (oblique and nominative feminine singular journale)

  1. daily

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French journal.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

journal c

  1. a journal, a magazine, a periodical

DeclensionEdit

Declension of journal 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative journal journalen journaler journalerna
Genitive journals journalens journalers journalernas

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit