magazine

See also: Magazine

EnglishEdit

 
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The cover of the September 19, 1927, issue of Time, a weekly news magazine published in the United States.

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French magasin (warehouse, store), from Italian magazzino (storehouse), ultimately from Arabic مَخَازِن‎ pl (maḵāzin), plural of مَخْزَن(maḵzan, storeroom, storehouse), noun of place from خَزَنَ(ḵazana, to store, to stock, to lay up).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mæɡ.əˈzin/, /ˈmæɡ.ə.zin/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːn
  • Hyphenation: mag‧a‧zine

NounEdit

magazine (plural magazines)

  1. A non-academic periodical publication, generally consisting of sheets of paper folded in half and stapled at the fold.
  2. (military) An ammunition storehouse.
    1. (nautical) The portion of a warship where munitions are stored.
      The cruiser blew up when a shell hit its magazine.
      • 2021 March 10, Drachinifel, Guadalcanal Campaign - The Big Night Battle: Night 1 (IJN 3(?) : 2 USN)[1], archived from the original on 7 November 2022, retrieved 6 November 2022, 28:10 from the start:
        Juneau was making good time with the other surviving U.S. Navy ships, despite her damage, when the I-26 spotted her and sent a salvo of Type 95 torpedoes in her direction. Passing between the Helena and San Francisco, some indication being they had actually been shot at the San Francisco and gone long because San Francisco was travelling significantly slower than expected, they nonetheless hit Juneau and detonated the ship's magazine.
  3. A chamber in or attachable to a firearm enabling multiple rounds of ammunition to be fed into the firearm.
  4. A reservoir or supply chamber for a stove, battery, camera, typesetting machine, or other apparatus.
  5. (archaic) A country or district especially rich in natural products.
  6. (archaic) A city viewed as a marketing center.
  7. (archaic) A store, or shop, where goods are kept for sale.
  8. (television) A collection of Teletext pages.
    • 1983, Channels of Communications (volume 3, page 41)
      Most teletext "magazines" contain about 100 pages of information, typically including news headlines, weather reports, sports scores, video games, and stock prices.
    • 1984, Telecommunications (volume 18, page 89)
      The operator is able to build Teletext magazines of, typically, 100 pages per magazine, specify transmission times []

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English magazine. The neuter gender is due to magazijn.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɛ.ɡəˌziːn/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧ga‧zi‧ne

NounEdit

magazine n (plural magazines)

  1. magazine (periodical publication)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English magazine, from Middle French magasin (warehouse, store), from Italian magazzino (storehouse), ultimately from Arabic مَخَازِن‎ pl (maḵāzin), plural of مَخْزَن(maḵzan, storeroom, storehouse), noun of place from خَزَنَ(ḵazana, to store, to stock, to lay up). Doublet of magasin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

magazine m (plural magazines)

  1. magazine (periodical publication)
    Synonyms: revue, périodique

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English magazine, from Middle French magasin, from Italian magazzino.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

magazine m (plural magazines)

  1. magazine (publication, especially the supplement of a newspaper)
    Synonym: rivista

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ magazine in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Further readingEdit

  • magazine in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

magazine m (plural magazines)

  1. department store (store containing many departments)
    Synonym: loja de departamento

RomanianEdit

NounEdit

magazine n pl

  1. plural of magazin