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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English kindrede, alteration (with epenthetic d) of kinrede, cünreden (kindred), from Old English cynrēd, cynrǣden (kindred, family, generation, posterity, stock, species), from cynn (kind, sort, quality, race, family, rank, gender) + -rǣden (condition, state), equivalent to kin +‎ -red. More at kin.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ˈkĭndrĭd, ˈkĭndrəd, IPA(key): /ˈkɪndɹɪd/, /ˈkɪndɹəd/

NounEdit

kindred (plural kindreds)

  1. (often plural only) Distant and close relatives, collectively; kin. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  2. (often plural only) People of the same ethnic descent, not including speaker; brethren. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (countable) A grouping of relatives.
    • (Can we date this quote by Shakespeare and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      I think there's no man is secure / But the queen's kindred.
  4. (uncountable) Blood relationship.
  5. (uncountable) Affinity, likeness.

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NounEdit

kindred (plural kindreds)

  1. A combination of extended family and religious group, of the Ásatrú religious order in America.

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Further readingEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kindred (not comparable)

  1. Of the same nature, or of similar character.
    • 1924, Aristotle, Metaphysics, translated by W. D. Ross, Nashotah, Wisconsin, USA: The Classical Library, 2001, book 1, part 1.
      We have said in the Ethics what the difference is between art and science and the other kindred faculties;
  2. Connected, related, cognate, akin.
    kindred tongues

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