English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Probably from Middle English lete (a meeting or intersection of roads; junction; crossroads; conduit), from Old English ġelǣte (a going out, ending, meeting), as in Old English wæterġelǣt (watercourse, aquaduct), from Proto-Germanic *lētą, *galētą (a letting, a letting out). Cognate with Old High German gilāz (outlet, exit, end, road junction), German Gelaß (back room, recess, private chamber). Related to English let.

Noun edit

 
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leat (plural leats)

  1. An artificial watercourse, canal, or aqueduct, but especially a millrace.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Anagrams edit

Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

leat (emphatic leatsa)

  1. second-person singular of le: with you sg, to you sg

References edit

  1. ^ Finck, F. N. (1899) Die araner mundart (in German), volume I, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, page 196
  2. ^ de Bhaldraithe, Tomás (1977) Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge: An Deilbhíocht (in Irish), 2nd edition, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, § 308

Northern Sami edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Samic *leatēk (to be), from Proto-Uralic *le- (to become).

Pronunciation edit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈlea̯h(t)/

Verb edit

leat

  1. to be
  2. (possessor in locative case) to have, to possess
  3. (auxiliary) Forms the perfect tense, together with a past participle.

Usage notes edit

In the meaning "have", the thing possessed is in the nominative case, while the possessor is in the locative case.

Inflection edit

Odd, no gradation, irregular
infinitive leat
leahkit
1st sing. present lean
1st sing. past ledjen
infinitive leat
leahkit
action noun leapmi
present participle leahkki action inessive leamen
leame
leahkime
past participle leamaš action elative leames
agent participle action comitative
abessive
present indicative past indicative imperative
1st singular lean ledjen lēhkon
2nd singular leat ledjet leagẹ
3rd singular lea lei
leai
lēhkos
1st dual letne leimme leadnu
leahkku
2nd dual leahppi leidde leahkki
3rd dual leaba leigga
leaigga
lēhkoska
1st plural leat leimmet lēhkot
leatnot
2nd plural lēhpet leiddet lēhket
3rd plural leat ledje lēhkoset
connegative leat lean leagẹ
conditional 1 conditional 2 potential
1st singular livččen leaččan
2nd singular livččet leaččat
3rd singular livččii leš
leaš
leažžá
1st dual livččiime ležže
2nd dual livččiide leažžabeahtti
3rd dual livččiiga leažžaba
1st plural livččiimet leažžat
2nd plural livččiidet leažžabehtet
3rd plural livčče ležžet
connegative livčče leš
leaš
leačča

Alternative forms edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Koponen, Eino, Ruppel, Klaas, Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002–2008), Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Old Church Slavonic лѣто (lěto), from Proto-Slavic *lěto.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

leat n (plural leaturi)

  1. (dated) year
  2. (figurative) being of the same age
  3. (dated) recruit

Declension edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish lat. Cognates include Irish leat and Manx lhiat.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /lɛʰt̪/, /laʰt̪/
  • Hyphenation: leat

Pronoun edit

leat

  1. second-person singular of le: with you; by you

Inflection edit

Personal inflection of le
Number Person Simple Emphatic
Singular 1st leam leamsa
2nd leat leatsa
3rd m leis leis-san
3rd f leatha leathase
Plural 1st leinn leinne
2nd leibh leibhse
3rd leotha leothasan

References edit

  • Colin Mark (2003) The Gaelic-English dictionary, London: Routledge, →ISBN, page 382

West Frisian edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

leat c (plural leaten, diminutive leatsje)

  1. plant shoot

Further reading edit

  • leat”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011