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See also: Leet and le'et

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare Old English hlēte, *hlīete (share, lot), cognate with Old Norse hleyti (share, portion).

NounEdit

leet (plural leets)

  1. (Scotland) A portion or list, especially a list of candidates for an office; also the candidates themselves.[1]

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English lēt, past tense of lǣtan (to let).

VerbEdit

leet

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense of let

Etymology 3Edit

Originated 1400–50 from late Middle English lete (meeting), from Anglo-Norman lete and Medieval Latin leta, possibly from Old English gelǣte (crossroads).

NounEdit

leet (plural leets)

  1. (Britain, obsolete) A regular court, more specifically a court-leet, in which certain lords had jurisdiction over local disputes, or the physical area of this jurisdiction.[1]

Etymology 4Edit

Common name in Scotland and North Country England, that varies regionally and confuses several species. Scottish lythe, laid, laith. Pollack. "...called leets on the coast near Scarborough... the lyth, or ly-fish, is frequently caught ... in deep holes among the rocks". cf. "To LYTHE, v. a. To shelter..."[2]

NounEdit

leet (plural leets)

  1. The European pollock.
    • William Hughes
      The whiting pollock sometimes, par excellence is styled pollock only. On the Yorkshire coast it is called a leet, and in Scotland a lythe.[3]

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

leet (plural leets)

  1. Alternative form of leat (watercourse)

Etymology 6Edit

An aphetic form of elite, respelled according to leetspeak conventions.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

leet (plural leets)

  1. (Internet slang) Abbreviation of leetspeak.

AdjectiveEdit

leet (comparative more leet, superlative most leet)

  1. Of or relating to leetspeak.
  2. (slang) Possessing outstanding skill in a field; expert, masterful.
  3. (slang) Having superior social rank over others; upper class, elite.
  4. (slang) Awesome, typically to describe a feat of skill; cool, sweet.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Brown, Lesley. The New shorter Oxford English dictionary on historical principles. Clarendon Oxford 1993 isbn=0-19-861271-0
  2. ^ Jamieson, John. Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language [1]
  3. ^ William Hughes. A Practical Treatise on the Choice and Cookery of Fish[2] year=1854 publisher=Longman, Brown, Green and Longmans p. 27
  • leet” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–.
  • "leet" in the Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, MICRA, 1996, 1998.

AnagramsEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch lēth, from Proto-Germanic *laiþaz.

AdjectiveEdit

lêet

  1. loathsome, abhorrent
InflectionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Dutch *lēth, from Proto-Germanic *laiþą.

NounEdit

lêet n

  1. damage, harm
  2. suffering, sadness
  3. sickness
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • leet (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • leet (III)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • leet (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • leet (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

NorwegianEdit

VerbEdit

leet

  1. Past tense and past participle of lee

Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian let, from Proto-Germanic *lataz. More at late.

AdjectiveEdit

leet

  1. late

Related termsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Old English hlēte (share, lot).

NounEdit

leet (plural leets)

  1. a list