See also: Leam

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lemen, from Old English lȳman, from Proto-West Germanic *liuhmijan, from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light, bright).

VerbEdit

leam (third-person singular simple present leams, present participle leaming, simple past and past participle leamed)

  1. (intransitive, UK, dialectal) To gleam; shine; glow.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English leme, from Old English lēoma (ray of light, beam, radiance, gleam, glare, lightning), from Proto-Germanic *leuhmô (light, shine), from Proto-Indo-European *leuk- (light, bright). Cognate with Icelandic ljómi (gleam, ray, beam, flash of light), Latin lumen (light).

NounEdit

leam (plural leams)

  1. (UK, dialectal) A gleam or flash of light; a glow or glowing.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See leamer, lien.

NounEdit

leam (plural leams)

  1. A cord or strap for leading a dog.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

leam

  1. accusative singular of lea

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish lem. Cognates include Irish liom and Manx lhiam.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛm/
  • Hyphenation: leam

PronounEdit

leam

  1. first-person singular of le: with me; by me
    Is toil leam Glaschu.I like Glasgow. (literally, “Is pleasure with me Glasgow.”)

InflectionEdit

Personal inflection of le
Number Person Simple Emphatic
Singular 1st leam leamsa
2nd leat leatsa
3rd m leis leis-san
3rd f leatha leathase
Plural 1st leinn leinne
2nd leibh leibhse
3rd leotha leothasan

ReferencesEdit

  • Colin Mark (2003) The Gaelic-English dictionary, London: Routledge, →ISBN, page 382