EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lemen, from Old English lȳman, *līeman (to shine), from Proto-Germanic *liuhmijaną (to shine), from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light, bright). Cognate with Icelandic ljóma (to glow), Latin luminō (light up).

VerbEdit

leam (third-person singular simple present leams, present participle leaming, simple past and past participle leamed)

  1. (intransitive, Britain, dialectal) To gleam; shine; glow.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English leme, from Old English lēoma (ray of light, beam, radiance, gleam, glare, lightning), from Proto-Germanic *leuhmô (light, shine), from Proto-Indo-European *leuk- (light, bright). Cognate with Icelandic ljómi (gleam, ray, beam, flash of light), Latin lumen (light).

NounEdit

leam (plural leams)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) A gleam or flash of light; a glow or glowing.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See leamer, lien.

NounEdit

leam (plural leams)

  1. A cord or strap for leading a dog.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir Walter Scott to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

PronounEdit

leam

  1. with me, by me
    Is toil leam Glaschu.I like Glasgow. (literally Is pleasure with me Glasgow.)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit