See also: Leam

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English lemen, from Old English lȳman, from Proto-West Germanic *liuhmijan, from Proto-Indo-European *lewk- (light, bright).

Verb edit

leam (third-person singular simple present leams, present participle leaming, simple past and past participle leamed)

  1. (intransitive, UK, dialectal) To gleam; shine; glow.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English leme, from Old English lēoma (ray of light, beam, radiance, gleam, glare, lightning), from Proto-Germanic *leuhmô (light, shine), from Proto-Indo-European *leuk- (light, bright). Cognate with Icelandic ljómi (gleam, ray, beam, flash of light), Latin lumen (light).

Noun edit

leam (plural leams)

  1. (UK, dialectal) A gleam or flash of light; a glow or glowing.

See also edit

Etymology 3 edit

See leamer, lien.

Noun edit

leam (plural leams)

  1. A cord or strap for leading a dog.

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Verb edit

leam

  1. (reintegrationist norm, less recommended) third-person plural present indicative of lear
  2. (reintegrationist norm, less recommended) inflection of ler:
    1. third-person plural present subjunctive
    2. third-person plural imperative

Latin edit

Noun edit

leam

  1. accusative singular of lea

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish lem. Cognates include Irish liom and Manx lhiam.

Pronunciation edit

  • (Lewis) IPA(key): /lɔ̃ũm/, /ləm/
  • (Uist, Barra, Skye, Sutherland) IPA(key): /lu(ː)m/ (as if spelled lium)
  • (Argyll) IPA(key): /lɛm/
  • Hyphenation: leam

Pronoun edit

leam

  1. first-person singular of le: with me; by me
    Is toil leam Glaschu.I like Glasgow. (literally, “Is pleasure with me Glasgow.”)

Inflection edit

Personal inflection of le
Number Person Simple Emphatic
Singular 1st leam leamsa
2nd leat leatsa
3rd m leis leis-san
3rd f leatha leathase
Plural 1st leinn leinne
2nd leibh leibhse
3rd leotha leothasan

References edit

  • Colin Mark (2003) The Gaelic-English dictionary, London: Routledge, →ISBN, page 382

Yola edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Irish léim.

Noun edit

leam

  1. jump

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 58