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CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German lūs, from Old High German lūs, from Proto-Germanic *lūs. Cognate with German Laus, Dutch luis, English louse, Icelandic lús.

NounEdit

laus f (plural lòize)

  1. (Sette Comuni) louse

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “laus” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

laus

  1. Romanization of 𐌻𐌰𐌿𐍃

GutnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lauss, from Proto-Germanic *lausaz.

AdjectiveEdit

laus

  1. loose

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lauss.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

laus (comparative lausari, superlative lausastur)

  1. loose
  2. free to go
  3. available
  4. vacant

InflectionEdit

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From echoic Proto-Indo-European root *lewt-, *lewdʰ- (song, sound), from Proto-Indo-European *lew- (to sound, resound, sing out), see also Irish laoidh (song, poem), Gothic 𐌻𐌹𐌿𐌸𐍉𐌽 (liuþōn, to praise), German Lied (song), Old Norse ljóð (poem), and Old English leoð (song, hymn, poem).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

laus f (genitive laudis); third declension

  1. praise, glory
  2. fame

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative laus laudēs
Genitive laudis laudum
Dative laudī laudibus
Accusative laudem laudēs
Ablative laude laudibus
Vocative laus laudēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • laus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • laus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • laus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • laus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to praise, extol, commend a person: laude afficere aliquem
    • to praise, extol, commend a person: (maximis, summis) laudibus efferre aliquem or aliquid
    • to praise, extol, commend a person: eximia laude ornare aliquem
    • to overwhelm with eulogy: omni laude cumulare aliquem
    • to extol, laud to the skies: laudibus aliquem (aliquid) in caelum ferre, efferre, tollere
    • to consider a thing creditable to a man: aliquid laudi alicui ducere, dare
    • to confer distinction on a person; to redound to his credit: gloriae, laudi esse
    • to be very famous, illustrious: gloria, laude florere
    • to be guided by ambition: laudis studio trahi
    • to be consumed by the fires of ambition: gloriae, laudis cupiditate incensum esse, flagrare
    • to be distinguished as a poet: poetica laude florere
    • to be a distinguished orator: eloquentiae laude florere
    • the word aemulatio is employed with two meanings, in a good and a bad sense: aemulatio dupliciter dicitur, ut et in laude et in vitio hoc nomen sit
    • (ambiguous) to praise, extol, commend a person: laudem tribuere, impertire alicui
    • (ambiguous) to spread a person's praises: alicuius laudes praedicare
    • (ambiguous) to win golden opinions from every one: omnium undique laudem colligere
    • (ambiguous) to win golden opinions from every one: maximam ab omnibus laudem adipisci
    • (ambiguous) to confer distinction on a person; to redound to his credit: laudem afferre
    • (ambiguous) to be guided by ambition: laudem, gloriam quaerere
    • (ambiguous) to detract from a person's reputation, wilfully underestimate a person: alicuius famam, laudem imminuere
    • (ambiguous) to render obscure, eclipse a person: obscurare alicuius gloriam, laudem, famam (not obscurare aliquem)
    • (ambiguous) to sing the praises of some one (not canere aliquem: alicuius laudes versibus persequi
    • (ambiguous) to sing the praises of some one (not canere aliquem: alicuius laudes (virtutes) canere
    • (ambiguous) to thank, glorify the immortal gods: grates, laudes agere dis immortalibus
  • laus in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[2]
  • laus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers



Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

laus

  1. loose

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lauss

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

laus (masculine and feminine laus, neuter laust, definite singular and plural lause, comparative lausare, indefinite superlative lausast, definite superlative lausaste)

  1. loose
  2. flimsy
  3. free (not fastened)

See alsoEdit


ReferencesEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English louse.

NounEdit

laus

  1. any external parasitic insect; flea; louse.

WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse lauss, from Proto-Germanic *lausaz.

AdjectiveEdit

laus (neuter laust)

  1. loose; free; detached
    Han råkä sä längj pau ä, dilläs ä gikk laust.
    He shaked it for so long, until it came loose.

Related termsEdit


White HmongEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

laus

  1. old

See alsoEdit