EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English or, oor, blend of Old English ōra (ore, unwrought metal) and ār (brass, copper, bronze), the first a derivate of ear (earth), the second from Proto-Germanic *aiz (cognates Old Norse eir (brass, copper), German ehern (of metal, of iron), Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌶 (aiz, ore)), from Proto-Indo-European *áyos, h₂éyos. Compare Dutch oer (ferrous hardpan; bog iron ore). Compare Latin aes (bronze, copper), Avestan 𐬀𐬌𐬌𐬀𐬵(aiiah), Sanskrit अयस् (áyas, copper, iron).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ore (countable and uncountable, plural ores)

 
Manganese ore (psilomelane)
  1. Rock or other material that contains valuable or utilitarian materials; primarily a rock containing metals or gems for which it is typically mined and processed.
    • 2014 April 21, “Subtle effects”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8884:
      Manganism has been known about since the 19th century, when miners exposed to ores containing manganese, a silvery metal, began to totter, slur their speech and behave like someone inebriated.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ore

  1. plural of oor

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hōra. Compare Romanian oară.

NounEdit

ore f (plural or, definite articulation ora)

  1. a time, instance

BasqueEdit

NounEdit

ore inan

  1. dough

BorôroEdit

NounEdit

ore

  1. child

GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

ore

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of orar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of orar

GuaraníEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ore

  1. we (exclusive)
    Ore roha'ã.We (excluding the listener, we and not you) try.
    Ñande jaháta okápe ha ore ropytáta ko yvyra pýpe.We (all, everyone) will go outside and we (not everyone, just me and some other people) will stay by this tree.

DeterminerEdit

ore

  1. our (possessive determiner of ore)
    Kóva ore mbo'ehao.This is our (and not your) school.

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈo.re/
  • Rhymes: -ore
  • Hyphenation: ó‧re

NounEdit

ore f

  1. plural of ora

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ore

  1. Rōmaji transcription of おれ

LatinEdit

NounEdit

ōre n

  1. ablative singular of ōs

ReferencesEdit

  • ore in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch ōra, from Proto-Germanic *ausô.

NounEdit

ôre n

  1. ear

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: oor
    • Afrikaans: oor
    • Jersey Dutch: ôr
    • Negerhollands: oor, hoor, ho
  • Limburgish: oear

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

ore

  1. Alternative form of oure (aurochs)

Etymology 2Edit

DeterminerEdit

ore

  1. Alternative form of oure (our)

Etymology 3Edit

DeterminerEdit

ore

  1. Alternative form of your

Etymology 4Edit

DeterminerEdit

ore

  1. (chiefly Early Middle English and West Midlands) Alternative form of here (their)

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

ore

  1. Alternative form of hore (muck)

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French ore.

AdverbEdit

ore

  1. now
    • 15th century, Rustichello da Pisa (original author), Mazarine Master (scribe), The Travels of Marco Polo, page 4, line 2:
      des choses lesquelles nous ne conterons pas ore
      of things we will not speak of now

DescendantsEdit

  • French: or

Middle High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German ōra, from Proto-Germanic *ausô.

NounEdit

ore n

  1. ear

DescendantsEdit

  • Alemannic German: Oor
  • Bavarian: Oar
  • Central Franconian: Uhr, Ohr
  • German: Ohr
  • Rhine Franconian:
    Pennsylvania German: Ohr
  • Vilamovian: ür
  • Yiddish: אויער(oyer)

Middle Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon ōra, from Proto-Germanic *ausô.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ôre n

  1. ear

DescendantsEdit

  • Low German: Ohr
    • Dutch Low Saxon: oor
    • German Low German: Or, Ur
      Plautdietsch: Oa, Ua

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ore f

  1. A mine, place in which ore is dug

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

ore

  1. now
DescendantsEdit
  • French: or (archaic)

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin hōra, from Ancient Greek ὥρα (hṓra).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ore f (oblique plural ores, nominative singular ore, nominative plural ores)

  1. hour; time, period of the day (period of time)
DescendantsEdit

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

ore

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of orar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of orar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of orar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of orar

RomanianEdit

NounEdit

ore

  1. inflection of oră:
    1. plural
    2. genitive/dative singular

Serbo-CroatianEdit

VerbEdit

ore (Cyrillic spelling оре)

  1. third-person singular present of orati

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

ore

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of orar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of orar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of orar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of orar.

TarantinoEdit

NounEdit

ore

  1. gold

Tocharian BEdit

NounEdit

ore

  1. dust, dirt