notable

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English notable, from Anglo-Norman notable, Middle French notable (noteworthy), from Latin notābilis (noteworthy, extraordinary), from notō (to note, mark); corresponding to note +‎ -able.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

notable (comparative more notable, superlative most notable)

  1. Worthy of note; remarkable; memorable; noted or distinguished. [from 14th c.]
    • {{RQ:Shakespeare Verona}|passage=[...] how sayest thou, that my master is become a notable lover?}}
  2. Easily noted (without connotations of value); clearly noticeable, conspicuous. [from 14th c.]
  3. That can be observed; perceptible. [from 14th c.]
    • 1989, Stanton Peele, Diseasing of America:
      Dyslexia is most notable in children who are unable to focus on their assignments.
    • 2020 June 17, David Clough, “Then and now: trains through Crewe”, in Rail, page 60:
      Another most notable change concerns rolling stock liveries. Back then, corporate Rail Blue was omnipresent, whereas now there is a kaleidoscope of colours and styles.
  4. (now rare) Industrious, energetic; (specifically) (usually of a woman) capable, efficient in household management. [from 17th c.]
    • c. 1793, Edward Gibbon, Memoirs, Penguin, page 48:
      During his residence abroad, his concerns at home were managed by his mother Hester, an active and notable woman.
    • 1863, Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell, Sylvia's lovers:
      Hester looked busy and notable with her gown pinned up behind her, and her hair all tucked away under a clean linen cap; []
  5. (obsolete) Useful; profitable.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

notable (plural notables)

  1. A person or thing of distinction.
    • July 16 1875, Carl Schurz, letter to W. M. Grosvenor
      What we ought to have, in my opinion, is a meeting of notables—men whose names will be of weight with the country and who can be depended upon to agree to an independent course.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin notābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

notable (epicene, plural notables)

  1. notable

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin notābilis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

notable (masculine and feminine plural notables)

  1. notable

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French notable, from Latin notābilis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

notable (plural notables)

  1. notable

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

notable m (plural notables)

  1. notable

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin notābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

notable m or f (plural notables)

  1. notable

Derived termsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin notābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

notable m or f (plural notables)

  1. important; significant

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin notābilis. Cognate with English notable.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

notable (plural notables, superlative notabilísimo)

  1. remarkable, notable, noteworthy, noticeable, significant, marked, outstanding, striking, noted

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit