phantom

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fantom, fantum, from Old French fantosme, from Latin phantasma, from Ancient Greek φάντασμα ‎(phántasma).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

phantom ‎(plural phantoms)

  1. Something apparently seen, heard, or sensed, but having no physical reality; a ghost or apparition; something elusive or delusive.
  2. An image that appears only in the mind; an illusion.

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

phantom ‎(not comparable)

  1. Illusive.
    • 1899, Stephen Crane, chapter 1, Twelve O'Clock:
      […] (it was the town's humour to be always gassing of phantom investors who were likely to come any moment and pay a thousand prices for everything) — “[…] Them rich fellers, they don't make no bad breaks with their money. […]”
  2. Fictitious or nonexistent.
    a phantom limb

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

  • phantom” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

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