See also: plänk-

EnglishEdit

 
Planks (pieces of timber)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English plank, planke, borrowed from Old French planke, Old Northern French planque (compare French planche, from Old French planche), from Vulgar Latin planca, from palanca, from Latin phalanga. The Latin term derives from the Ancient Greek φάλαγξ (phálanx), so it is thus a doublet of phalange and phalanx. Compare also the doublet planch, borrowed later from Middle French.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plank (plural planks)

  1. A long, broad and thick piece of timber, as opposed to a board which is less thick.
  2. (figuratively) A political issue that is of concern to a faction or a party of the people and the political position that is taken on that issue.
    Germanization was a central plank of German conservative thinking in the 19th and 20th centuries.
    • 1996 August 24, Frank Bruni, “Dole Rejects a Party Plank”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      When Mr. Dole had been asked at the Republican convention about the same immigration amendment—one of the more conservative and sensitive planks—he did not oppose it, but said he would have to think long and hard before supporting it.
    • 2011, Guy Standing, chapter 1, in The Precariat[2], Bloomsbury Publishing, published 2016, →ISBN:
      In the 1970s, a group of ideologically inspired economists captured the ears and minds of politicians. The central plank of their ‘neo-liberal’ model was that growth and development depended on market competitiveness; []
  3. Physical exercise in which one holds a pushup position for a measured length of time.
  4. (Britain, slang) A stupid person, idiot.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:idiot
  5. That which supports or upholds.
    • 1829, Robert Southey, Sir Thomas More; or, Colloquies on the Progress and Prospects of Society
      His charity is a better plank than the faith of an intolerant and bitter-minded bigot.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Tok Pisin: plangk

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

plank (third-person singular simple present planks, present participle planking, simple past and past participle planked)

  1. (transitive) To cover something with planking.
    to plank a floor or a ship
  2. (transitive) To bake (fish, etc.) on a piece of cedar lumber.
    • 1998, Richard Gerstell, American Shad in the Susquehanna River Basin (page 147)
      Along the lower river, planked shad dinners (baked and broiled) were highly popular during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
  3. (transitive, colloquial) To lay down, as on a plank or table; to stake or pay cash.
    to plank money in a wager
  4. (transitive) To harden, as hat bodies, by felting.
  5. To splice together the ends of slivers of wool, for subsequent drawing.
  6. (intransitive) To pose for a photograph while lying rigid, face down, arms at side, in an unusual place.
    • 2011 May 23, “Party finishes up in plonking after attempt at planking in Kingsford”, in Herald Sun[3]:
      The woman, known as Claudia, fell from a 2m wall after earlier demonstrating the wrong way to plank on a small stool while holding a bottle of wine. A friend said some guests had not heard of planking and Claudia was demonstrating how ridiculous it was.
    • 2011 May 24, “Tourists snapped planking at iconic landmarks around the world”, in The Australian[4]:
      Perth man Simon Carville became an internet sensation after he was photographed planking naked in the arms of famous Perth statue the Eliza.

TranslationsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch plank, from Middle Dutch planke, from Old Dutch [Term?], from Old Northern French planke, from Late Latin planca.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plank (plural planke, diminutive plankie)

  1. A plank.

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch planke, from Old Dutch *planca, from Old Northern French planke, from Late Latin planca.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plank f (plural planken, diminutive plankje n)

  1. shelf
  2. (wooden or plastic) plank.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English plank.

NounEdit

plank m (invariable)

  1. (neologism) plank (physical exercise)

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

plank n

  1. a high wooden fence which completely prevents any seeing-through

DeclensionEdit

Declension of plank 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative plank planket plank planken
Genitive planks plankets planks plankens

Derived termsEdit