Translingual edit

Etymology edit

English Anyin

Symbol edit

any

  1. (international standards) language code for Anyin.

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms edit

  • anie (obsolete)
  • anny (pronunciation spelling)

Etymology edit

From Middle English any, eny, ony, ani, aniȝ, eniȝ, æniȝ, from Old English ǣniġ (any), from Proto-West Germanic *ainīg, *ainag, from Proto-Germanic *ainagaz, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz (one), equivalent to one +‎ -y. Cognate to Saterland Frisian eenich (some), West Frisian iennich (only), Dutch enig (any, some), Afrikaans enig (any), German Low German enig (some), German einig (some), Italian unico (unique), French unique (unique). Doublet of unique.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

any (not comparable)

  1. To even the slightest extent, at all.
    I will not remain here any longer.
    If you get any taller, you'll start having to duck through doorways!
    That doesn't bother me any. (chiefly US usage)
    • 1934, Rex Stout, Fer-de-Lance, Bantam, published 1992, →ISBN, page 58:
      I wasn't any too easy in my mind.
    • 1934, Agatha Christie, chapter 4, in Murder on the Orient Express, London: HarperCollins, published 2017, page 104:
      'That wouldn't surprise me any.'

Translations edit

Determiner edit

any

  1. (chiefly in the negative) One at all; at least one; at least one kind of; some; a positive quantity of.
    Do you have any biscuits?
    Do you have any food?
    I haven't got any money.
    It won't do you any good.
  2. No matter what kind.
    Choose any item you want.
    Any person may apply.
    Press any key to continue.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, →OCLC:
      This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking. In complexion fair, and with blue or gray eyes, he was tall as any Viking, as broad in the shoulder.
    • 2013 July 20, “Welcome to the plastisphere”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8845:
      Plastics are energy-rich substances, which is why many of them burn so readily. Any organism that could unlock and use that energy would do well in the Anthropocene. Terrestrial bacteria and fungi which can manage this trick are already familiar to experts in the field.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Pronoun edit

any

  1. Any thing(s) or person(s).
    Any may apply.

Translations edit

References edit

  • any”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin annus, from Proto-Italic *atnos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂et-no-, probably from *h₂et- (to go).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

any m (plural anys)

  1. year
    un home de 26 anysa 26-year-old man
    Quants anys tens?How old are you?
    Bon any nou!Happy new year!

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Determiner edit

any

  1. Alternative form of ani

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

any

  1. Alternative form of anoy

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

any

  1. Alternative form of anoyen

Old Tupi edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

any

  1. Alternative form of anũ

Descendants edit

  • Portuguese: ani

References edit

  • Navarro, Eduardo de Almeida; 2013; Dicionário do Tupi Antigo: a língua indígena clássica do Brasil; São Paulo: Global.

Yola edit

Adjective edit

any

  1. Alternative form of aany
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 6, page 86:
      Yith w'had any lhuck, oor naame wode b' zung,
      If we had any luck, our name would have been sung

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 86