Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: płod and płód

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English *plodden (found only in derivative plodder), probably originally a splash through water and mud, from plod (a puddle). Compare Dutch plodden, Dutch plodderen and Danish pladder (mire).

NounEdit

plod (uncountable)

  1. A slow or labored walk or other motion or activity.
    We started at a brisk walk and ended at a plod.

VerbEdit

plod (third-person singular simple present plods, present participle plodding, simple past and past participle plodded)

  1. (intransitive) To walk or move slowly and heavily or laboriously (+ on, through, over).
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 50,[1]
      The beast that bears me, tired with my woe,
      Plods dully on, to bear that weight in me,
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island Part One, Chapter 1
      • I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the inn door, his sea chest following behind him in a handbarrow;
  2. (transitive) To trudge over or through.
    • 1596, Henoch Clapham, A Briefe of the Bible, Edinburgh: Robert Walde-grave, p. 127,[2]
      Quest[ion]. Where was Ioseph?
      Answ[er]. It may be, he was playing the Carpenter abrode for all their three livings, but sure it is, he was not idlely plodding the streetes, much lesse tipling in the Taverne with our idle swingers.
    • 1799, Matthew Gregory Lewis, The Love of Gain, London: J. Bell, p. 50, lines 449-451,[3]
      [] Speed thou to Lombard-street,
      Or plod the gambling 'Change with busy feet,
      'Midst Bulls and Bears some false report to spread,
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, London: The Richards Press, XLVI, pp. 69-70,[4]
      Break no rosemary, bright with rime
      And sparkling to the cruel clime;
      Nor plod the winter land to look
      For willows in the icy brook
      To cast them leafless round him []
  3. To toil; to drudge; especially, to study laboriously and patiently.
    • 1597, Michael Drayton, “Edward the fourth to Shores wife” in Englands Heroicall Epistles, London: N. Ling,[5]
      Poore plodding schoolemen, they are farre too low,
      which by probations, rules and axiom’s goe,
      He must be still familiar with the skyes,
      which notes the reuolutions of thine eyes;
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English plod. Cognate with Danish pladder (mire).

NounEdit

plod (plural plods)

  1. (obsolete) A puddle.

Etymology 3Edit

From PC Plod.

NounEdit

plod (usually uncountable, plural plods)

  1. (Britain, mildly derogatory, uncountable, usually with "the") the police, police officers
  2. (Britain, mildly derogatory, countable) a police officer, especially a low-ranking one.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *plodъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plod m

  1. fruit
  2. fetus

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • plod in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • plod in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *plodъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plȏd m (Cyrillic spelling пло̑д)

  1. fruit (part of plant)

DeclensionEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *plodъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

plód m inan (genitive plodú or plóda, nominative plural plodôvi or plódi)

  1. fruit (part of plant)

DeclensionEdit